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https://www.duolingo.com/MajoBeno

Learn german after dutch. Good or not?

MajoBeno
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Hoy allemaal I speak English B2, is it good to start learning German after finishing Dutch tree? I do not want to have my head mixed. Thank you for your opinions!

PS.: I really hate german. But somebody said that it's a "MUST" to learn it for good job, because i live near Austria.

What do you mean?

3
2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lelieblad

Typically when people finish a tree, they're at an advanced beginner level. I'd wait until you're beyond the beginner stage, personally.

I'd say wait until you're comfortable reading books and other native material in Dutch before starting German.

5
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lelieblad

And yeah, if you hate German, well, you're not going to find much success likely.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muscletwink
muscletwink
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I have to agree with what the other participants said. If you think like this: "Nenávidím tento jazyk,ale potrebujem ho k práci..." you will NEVER learn it well, it will be a torture for you each time you have to speak it. If you're European you can work in any EU country. So why not try your luck in the Netherlands ? If you enjoy Dutch and speak English you'll find something there, instead of struggling in your country and speaking a language you don't enjoy...

3
Reply22 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohanVanderbalij

I might add, regarding the post above, that you can also try your luck in Belgium, especially in Brussels which is officially bilingual (Dutch/French). There are also a lot of places like restaurants with the menu all written in English only (this city is quite multicultural)! Since you want to learn a new language after Dutch, then French would be a great idea there, you won't learn the hated language and you won't mix French with Dutch! I am personally doing exactly the opposite : knowing French/English and learning Dutch here, it's an awesome experience! Well now it's up to you to decide...

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/muscletwink
muscletwink
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True :-) I just wasn't sure whether the OP wanted to learn French in the first place. However Brussels is definitely more on the French side (for me at last) when it comes to languages that are spoken there, even though it's officially bilingual. But yeah, try your luck in Flanders/Belgium as well, you never know...

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
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Dutch will help with German. You might get them mixed up a little, but it will be the Dutch mixing into the German, usually not the other way around. They're similar in many ways. Dutch grammar is a bit less complicated, though.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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German is very related to both English and Dutch. It has more noun endings, but it will probably be fairly easy if you are comfortable with Dutch.

Why do you hate German?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MajoBeno
MajoBeno
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Thank you for your answer. I do not know, it is good to know german in my country. But i do not like this language and grammar i do not know why. I love germany/CH/AT. But language.. i do not know. I would like rather learn some another language. And if I can ask you, how is it possible to learn THAT MANY languages? :O I see a lot of flags next to your nickname. Thanks :))))

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
iwc2ufan
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Well, did you enjoy learning Dutch? They are very similar in many ways. German is a little bit harder, but not much. As for how to do many, just time and knowing how to learn a second language well and quickly. I mean, even though I have flags for Spanish, Portuguese and Italian, I learned them before Duolingo. I did the complete Portuguese and Spanish trees just to get a flavor of what Duolingo is like because I am an ESL teacher and I wanted to know if it was suitable for my students. At any rate, I think it's possible to do so many because I enjoy it and I already had a lot of language learning experience before I got here. Also, I don't do all over them every day. Usually I have 4-5 that I focus on at a time. Right now I am working mainly on Polish, Dutch (nearly done with my tree!), Welsh, Catalan and Norwegian. Keeping on top of Norwegian helps me maintain the other two Scandinavian languages because they are so similar. Whenever I go to do some Danish and Swedish, it still feels pretty fresh. Same with Russian and Ukrainian.

What language would you rather learn? If you have time, you could possibly do both.

3
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Axedrez

Grammar wise, German and Dutch are extremely similar. The only real difference resides in declensions, which are a familiar concept to you already from your native language.

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Reply2 years ago