"Ga i baned?"

Translation:May I have a cup of tea?

February 16, 2016

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Auleliel

So does "baned" mean "a cup of tea"? We haven't learned that yet so I'm not certain.

February 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Yes, paned is a cup of something, usually tea in this context, although you could just as well say paned o goffi. You will also often come across disgled or disglaid as an alternative to paned. Both are derived from other words:

dysgl (dish/cup/bowl) -> dysglaid (dishful/cupful) -> colloquially pronounced dishgled/disgled/disglad

cwpan (cup) -> cwpanaid (cupful) -> colloquially panaid/paned/panad

Similarly:

gwydr (glass) -> gwydraid (glassful) -> colloquially pronounced gwidred/gwidrad

February 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Willowfae

Seems odd without the verb 'to have'. Why is this missed out?

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ieuan-Jones

Ga is the future tense conjugation of cael (or to have). So "Ga i?" means, "Can I have?".

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Literally, "Will I get?" (cael = get, obtain). This is the idiomatic (and polite) way of asking for something (or to be allowed to do something). Thus, "Ga i baned?", "Ga i fynd i'r tŷ bach?" (May I have a cup of tea? May I go to the toilet?) .

January 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Ieuan-Jones

I think every single person who went to school in Wales as a child has the phrase "Ga i fynd i'r tŷ bach, os gwelwch yn dda" permanently burned into their brain!

January 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Salsmachev

So, does this have deeper nuance, referring to the cultural tradition of taking tea or is it the same as ga i de?

June 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

'cuppa' is just a British dialect way of saying 'a cup of tea'.

Ga i de? could be any of 'May I have tea/a tea/some tea?' and could include the meaning of 'tea' as an afternoon or early evening meal.

June 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Bendigeidfran

Ga i de will be the one I'd use then. Despite having grown up in Britain, most often I hear 'Can I have some tea' or 'lets have some tea', with the determiner usage. Having 'a cuppa' seems quite antiquated.

February 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/CacenCwningen

What I really need to know is this - why isn't 'te', the actual Welsh word for 'tea', included in this sentence?

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

It is not really needed - if you don’t specify paned/disgled o something else it is usually assumed that you mean tea.

November 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Cynphony

Is this one of those cases where you are asking for a cup and you will be filling it yourself with coffee, tea or something??

April 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dai_duolingo

Not really. This is pretty idiomatic and it's exactly what you would say. You're not asking for a 'cup' but rather a 'cupful'. It's not usually risky to assume that the contents will be tea, in Wales.

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tinmur

It did not accept "may i have a cup" for me

October 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

That is correct. See earlier discussion points.

October 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/stephanjs

Sorry but reading the above, I have to say the answer is wrong. Paned baned is a cup or a cuppa not a cup of tea. You cannot change a language unilaterally

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Eh? I don't see anyone attempting to change a language, unilaterally or otherwise. Ga i baned? can mean May I have a cup / a cuppa / a cup of tea? (depending on context, register, etc.) -- and I believe all three answers are accepted -- just as, for example, Ti'n moyn sleisen? can mean Do you want a slice / a slice of bread / a slice of cake? etc.

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Tymberlin

A "cuppa" doesnt really tranalate to cup of tea in american english at the very least.

March 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

This 'Britishism' is explained in the course notes. We strongly recommend reading the course notes for each new section before starting it - https://www.duolingo.com/comment/17638579

March 15, 2018
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