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  5. "Voy a obtener esa llave, si …

"Voy a obtener esa llave, si es necesario."

Translation:I am going to obtain that key, if it is necessary.

December 25, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickGiorgio

There! I see it! The one with the broken wing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/newmilwaukeee

i will 'go get' seems legit


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opus81
  • 1241

Shouldnt it be necesaria since llave is feminine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuintanillaJon

It's split into 2 sentence, so necesario refers to "es" which refers to a situation rather than the key (llave). Hope that wasn't confusing (I'm not good at explaining sometimes).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opus81
  • 1241

I understand now. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael189866

It might be, it might not. It all depends on if you think you're going to need a key at all. And it's a single sentence, not split into two, simply with a comma.


[deactivated user]

    The sound clip sounds garbled again


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLdawg

    Rats! I thought "si es necesario" was "yes it's necessary".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aumbria

    Duo is like a strict teacher! WAIT, is he a strict teacher?.... .... ....Nope. Hes just strict.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayDwivedi

    why not "i am going to obtain that key, yes it is necessary"? i wonder. if we got to say the above what would it be then?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah86687

    Si with no accent always means "if" while sí with an accent mark means "yes."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hanjoyship

    What's with the keys? I've had this question a few times, and also the one along the lines of "We are going to look for the keys." It seems that the keyholders could be a little more careful with their keys!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carolyn347679

    Why is the answer “win”


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicoRight

    http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/win -- it seems be used in the context of winning a contract or an election


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Diane72505

    I have a question: duo seems to insert commas fairly randomly from an English point of view. Here it is ok setting off a subordinate clause, but often it represents what we English teachers call a "comma splice," connecting two independent clauses without a conjunction. Any ideas about this?

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