Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuckley

What are some reasons to learn Irish?

I would like to learn Irish on Duolingo. I'm wondering what some reasons to learn it would be. Since there is a relatively small number of speakers compared to other languages here.

2 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
  • 25
  • 19
  • 17
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 48

Irish is making a comeback in Ireland, although it is very slow and needs to be worked towards... I have heard that the way it is taught it actually really poor, so maybe you can contribute to making learning the language easier if you like teaching. I have Irish on my list of languages to learn when I am proficient in my main ones (Spanish, Swedish, Italian, Welsh) because my family is part Irish and I feel that language and identity are closely tied, in a way.

But it's very difficult to learn; it has word order that seems odd to English speakers, if you translate "I am a man" (Is fear mé) and make a literal translation back to English, the word order would be something like "Am man I". And it's somewhat unique in it's own ways, the word for man (fear) is actually pronounced so it sounds more like "far" to native English speakers, even though we might think it sounds more like "feer" just by looking at it. If you like to impress people, though, then I'd add the difficulty of Irish to reasons to learn; maybe you can make people quite impressed!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuckley

Then i'll have to look at the basics. I tried the placement test and was totally lost. The words sound very familiar to an English speaker, yet the always have very different meanings.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hickory_2120

How hard is it to learn Irish?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyORB
CodyORB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5

On a scale of 1 to 10 Irish is 8 or 9.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuckley

That is making it a lot of fun though. Irish seems so alien compared to everything else.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyORB
CodyORB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5

Totally! It's seems to be from another world to me...

Kind of what makes Irish interesting!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bertolsuck

very easy i am learning it in school because i live in ireland

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

I'm confused by this - which words are you encountering that "sound very familiar to an English speaker"? Can you give a couple of examples?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hickory_2120

very true

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tillephant

If you live or visit Ireland it can be motivating to learn some Irish language. Of course everybody does speak English, but their is a fair amount of Irish around and people who know some Irish. I also felt that everyone is happy that I am trying to learn some Irish here and it's a great conversation topic as well. There is a comedian around here called Des Bishop who is originally from the states but moved to Ireland as a teenager and started to learn Irish as an adult as part of the show. The show is called "In the Name of the Fada" and you can actually watch it on Youtube. Probably not the greatest TV show ever but still interesting if you are interested in Irish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPqoKpyhzP8

Irish is very different from English and very different from the other languages you are learning here at the moment, so it is not easy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuckley

I'll have to watch the show for sure. Irish is a Celtic language compared to the Romance and Germanic languages I speak, so it will be a challenge for sure.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuckley

Thank you everyone for what you said, I've decided to start Irish. I'm already level 2 haha

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeTFitz
LukeTFitz
  • 9
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

I'm an Irish person. I learn Irish because I feel like I should play my role in bringing back the language. If Irish people don't start taking action on learning the language, it could die out, though people are trying. I can't give a reason for someone outside Ireland, It would be supportive though, and I'm sure people can find joy in learning it. I only made a post today about Irish in Ireland.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuckley

I feel like it is dying out because of how popular English seems to be growing around the world. The culture interest me a lot. But there seems to be such a lack of content in Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeTFitz
LukeTFitz
  • 9
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Yeah, major factors is that our education system is terrible at teaching languages and it isn't really a functional language in peoples eyes.English is much more useful to us. Also Irish people generally want to leave Ireland, so they would learn other languages instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hickory_2120

Very True and now that you speak of it someone needs to start a Youtube channel for Irish learners

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
  • 25
  • 1482

Since you’ve stated that you would like to learn Irish on Duolingo, you must have at least one reason of your own to do so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TylerBuckley

Looking for reasons outside of my interest in the culture and ancestry.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyORB
CodyORB
  • 24
  • 14
  • 7
  • 5

Irish is a very unique, beautiful, and complex language that I love. It's very difficult to learn though, but I'm adjusted to it :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristaKei

I decided to learn because my mom immigrated from Ireland to the US. One of our family traditions is to say chairs in irish as a toast. And well. It's part of my heritage.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
WildSage
  • 22
  • 20
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 13
  • 10
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

Say chairs?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristaKei

Yup. The story is that while one of my uncles was going to university he would go to the pub and drink with some englishmen. They would say "Cheers" when they toasted, and with the english accent it sounded to him like they were saying "chairs". So being the type of fellow he is he returned the toast by saying "chairs" only in Irish. and since then when ever my mom or my uncles make a toast we say chairs in Irish as a really odd family tradition.

My mom's side of the family is from Dungarven in county Waterford, born and raised.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NaoiseKell
NaoiseKell
  • 14
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4
  • 2
  • 8

you say cathaoir? or Sláinte

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bertolsuck

why did she is it because of the famine

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bertolsuck

learning irish could get you a united nations job

8 months ago