"In March"

Translation:Ym mis Mawrth

February 18, 2016

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/silverlight513

Is there a reason why "Mewn mis Mawrth" is not an accepted answer?

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

Mewn is unspecific (think "In a") whereas Yn is specific (think "In the") so since Mawrth is a specific time of year you use "yn"

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/silverlight513

Thank you for the clarification but what's the difference between Yn and Ym?

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

Yn is more or less considered the base word. It changes a little depending on the word that come after it. So "Yn yr ysbyty" is "in the hospital" and this is the form of (specific) "in" you will see most.
"Yn" becomes "Ym" before a word that starts with "M" so "Ym Maldwyn". It also takes this form if the word following it mutates to start with an "M" so "In a bottle" is "Yn + potel" which makes "Ym mhotel".
There is also another form of Yn which is Yng. This (as you can guess) comes before words that start with ng(except none of these exist to my knowledge) or mutate to start with yng. So "In a castle" is "Yn + Castell" which is "Yng nghastell".
Here is a link to a mutations grid to show you what all of the nasal mutations are: https://31.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m9ox8wy0rR1rw84ef.png
Also a way to remember the letters that mutate are T, C, P Doctors Go Bananas, Rhian Marries Llywelyn.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/silverlight513

Thanks for such a good explanation. I swear mutations will be the death of me.

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

Most of the population of Wales agrees with you, but one day they'll just click I'm sure

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/balbhan
  • 25
  • 17
  • 14
  • 14
  • 11
  • 10
  • 8
  • 3

It stops being difficult if you consider that "p", "b" and "m" are all pronounced with your lips, and "c", "g" and "ng" are all said in the same region towards the back of your mouth.

All languages (not just Welsh) tend to shift their sounds so they're more similar to adjacent sounds. Like how in English, "in caves" is really pronounced "ing caves" - although nobody bothers to write "in" that way! In fast speech, people often say "im places" too.

Welsh is only unusual in representing this shifting of sounds in writing, rather than leaving it unwritten.

February 19, 2016
Learn Welsh in just 5 minutes a day. For free.