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  5. "Sie sind aus Hamburg."

"Sie sind aus Hamburg."

Translation:They are from Hamburg.

December 25, 2013

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lang_learner_guy

"They are Hamburgers" is also a meaning...and, "frank"-ly, how often do you honestly get to call someone a "Hamburger" in all correctness...even if not in all seriousness?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveHansen0

And residents of Frankfurt are Frankfurters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jakub678955

Mc Donalds in Frankfurt do not sell Frankfurters. I'll have to travel to Hamburg to eat some Hamburgers over there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hilary810423

Is there a difference in translation between the following two sentences?

Sie sind aus Hamburg. Sie kommen aus Hamburg.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is there a difference in translation between the following two sentences?

Sie sind aus Hamburg. Sie kommen aus Hamburg.

No.

But Sie kommen aus Hamburg is more common in German and "They are from Hamburg" is more common in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/randygerman

With Sie capitalized, is there any way to know, simply from the sentence, whether it is "They are" or "You are".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

With Sie capitalized, is there any way to know, simply from the sentence, whether it is "They are" or "You are".

No.

In a real conversation, you would have context (have we just been speaking about them or about you?).

Without such context, there's no way to tell the difference between "they are" or "you are" when Sie sind… is at the beginning of a sentence. (And therefore both translations will be accepted on Duolingo.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanyamGira

What should i say for " you are from Hamburg" but using 'Sie' for 'you'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What should i say for " you are from Hamburg" but using 'Sie' for 'you'?

Sie kommen aus Hamburg.

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