"Os gwelwch chi'n dda"

Translation:Please

February 18, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/94BlueLane

Where on Earth has this come from?

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

I think it's literally something like "if you see (it) well".

February 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

A bit like s'il vous plaît in French, in a way. Often seen and heard as Os gwelwch yn dda, too.

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/6Nounouche

yes indeed. I'm French native speaker and agree with you

February 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/94BlueLane

Thanks guys :)

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/UY4WtgbK

Actually, I think the English "please" is short for "If you please". French has a similar phrasing. This one feels like "If you'd look kindly upon it" I love it.

March 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Beautifully said.

November 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/jackgovier

I was always taught "Os gwelwch yn dda" I'd guess it's also valid, but can anyone tell me why?

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverMundy

I have a Welsh grammar published in 1907 (E. Anwyl, Welsh Grammar for Schools) which, if I am understanding it rightly, often gives verb-forms without personal pronouns whereas this course is teaching us to include them. It looks as if the inclusion of the pronouns is either a modern development or a mark of colloquial rather than literary usage (Anwyl's work is professedly based on literary Welsh), or some combination of the two. Would anyone care to comment on this?

If the audio clip for this phrase is correct, it is very hard to tell whether the third word is ch'in or yn; certainly the ch-sound does not appear twice. Is there in fact any difference in pronunciation between the two forms?

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

I suppose the ending -wch already indicates that the subject is chi so you can leave it out without ambiguity.

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchietobe

When would you use this? Plis worked fine and this is soooo long.

February 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/HerrArbo

This has been used for much longer than 'plîs' and will come to seem perfectly normal to you once you are used to it.

May 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Zyndell2

More and more I'm noticing that words shown as translations can't be direct translations. Otherwise, Welsh has several words for "yes" that are not interchangeable. "Please" seems to be another one. I even reported something as being inaccurate because I took the translations at face value. For example, "i'r" does not mean "to the." It's interchangeable with "the" in seemingly randomly places. Mewn means "to" unless it means "by." The more I learn, the more foreign I realize the language is. I'm currently in the section that has me typing "I want to drink" repeatedly. It's apt.

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

If you have not been using them yet, it is worth going through the notes (https://www.duolingo.com/comment/17638579) for each new section before you begin it. We try and keep them up to date to address common questions that people raise.

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Zyndell2

TY. I need to get a book that goes into pronunciation and specifics. The program is wonderful. I just need to do some research to go with it.

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Your observations are true, Zyndell -- and it's a big and important step to realize that it's only occasionally that expressions in one language "map" directly onto those in others (and this is especially true for those involving prepositions, such as in, to, for etc.) -- but this is something that applies to all languages and not just Welsh. So i'r does mean "to the", but not only "to the" -- in the same way that in French au means "to the" (Je vais au cinéma), but it doesn't mean "to the" in, for example, un pain au chocolat!

February 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Brihug

If learning Welsh, you will soon want to drink....repeatedly!

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveLearnsWelsh

Why is this marked incorrect if you translate it as "If you please"

February 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

The usual equivalent English expression is simply 'please'.

February 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Brihug

I saw a You Tube video where it said that Os Gwelwch chi'n dda" literally meant "if seen as good". Seems to make sense as Gwelwch could come from Gweld and Dda from da (as in bore da). And the chi'n has the bod in there.

January 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DianeJones19

When I was in Aberdaron last June, I asked a native speaker about this phrase. He said it's almost never used. Most people, he said, just say "plis".

February 26, 2019
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