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  5. "Tá gruaig ghearr uirthi."

" gruaig ghearr uirthi."

Translation:She has short hair.

February 19, 2016

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AstroVulpes

Is the word "ghearr" related to the word for cut?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Yes. Hair is shorter after it has been cut.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NJI741534

Is ghearr lenited because gruaig is a feminine noun? Sorry, I've been away from Irish for a while and I've already forgotten basic rules.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

Yes. Attributive adjectives agree with their nouns in case, number and gender, so they are lenited after feminine nouns.


[deactivated user]

    Should not "It has short hair" have been accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

    Because that's not what it means.

    Uirthi is specifying a gender, "it" isn't. You're discarding information.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

    Does the pronoun use for Irish animals generally follow the gender of the word or the gender of the animal? If it's the latter, it could be a correct translation assuming, for instance, a female cat.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

    If the gender of the cat is sufficiently well known that you'd use uirthi in Irish, you would also use "she" in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

    Uirthi could refer to an animal that is a feminine noun, such as a sheep of unknown biological sex, for which “it” would be used in English. I think that it’s only people that are always referred to with a pronoun that corresponds to the biological sex rather than the grammatical gender, e.g. the masculine noun cailín would use uirthi.

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