"Czekanie na pociąg to nie podróżowanie."

Translation:Waiting for a train is not traveling.

February 19, 2016

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Michleariel

I though actually it was a quote or something. Or maybe that it had some philosophical meaning like if you want to do something, do it, waiting is not doing. Now that I've read the comments I see it's just a sentence, so it's a little bit disappointing)

February 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/CuisineRustique

Such philosophy. I now want to make all my dreams come true :D

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Makaronizm

What should it mean?

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

A sentence that uses two nouns derived from verbs.

It is not a "meaningful sentence". I can imagine some person saying - we spent 10 hours traveling here, and other saying well only two, the rest was waiting for a train, and that is not traveling.

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Meikel100

My response, "waiting for trains is not traveling", should be accepted.

December 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Wouldn't the Polish for that be "... na pociągi..." which is slightly different?

December 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Yeah, that can be rendered easily by using "pociągi". Sure, it's very close, but different.

December 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jack.Elliot

It is not travelling, waiting for the train.

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill

It's not very natural. Your construction is using a false subject "it" to postpone the real subject "waiting for a train". We do this sometimes, for example when the subject is an infinitive - "It's not nice to be kept waiting", but the natural position for a gerund subject ("waiting ...") is in normal subject position, at the beginning of the sentence.

May 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Paragonium

I think "Waiting on the train..." should be accepted as well.

December 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Unless it means that you are on the train and wait for something - and I understand it does not - then it seems correct, added.

December 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Presumably "waiting on <somebody>", as a wait-person in a restaurant would do, is a totally different verb?

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

'wait-person', really? Come on ;)

Yes, a different one. But I'm not exactly sure which one. "obsługiwać", maybe?

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristineckaK

I think it is an attempt to make the word gender neutral

January 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Exactly; hence also "mail carriers" rather than "mail man/woman" (the latter sounds a bit confusing anyway).

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Yes, really!! Fairly common US usage... I've also encountered, admittedly rather less often, "waitron".

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

OK, that sounds like a robot.

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/alik1989

Haha :) Or a subatomic particle

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Trofaste

I have to say I've never heard either... And I'm not especially sad about that. :D

March 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cwjames19

Sorry, I've never heard either of those and I'm from the US too.

December 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristineckaK

what else than waiting on the train for something would it mean?

January 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

As far as I know, "to wait on" can be synonymous with "to wait for", although it's very surprising to me.

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryMcCarthy99

Yes; "wait on" is synonymous to "wait for" . Used more in the North of England.

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Davey944676

It's most often used for something which is causing a delay, such as "I'm waiting on a delivery" or "We are still waiting on the paperwork".

(But yes, it can mean waiting for anybody or anything, especially in Northern England)

March 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/oyvei

Could someone explain when and why "to" is used instead of "jest" (both meaning "is")?

October 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Okcydent

Check here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/16373167
It's a detailed introduction to the problem.

October 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/francois.gauti3r

Maybe "waiting for a train that is not travelling" would be better?

January 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

From the point of view of grammar, that is not a sentence... you could probably use a dash between them and write "Waiting for a train - that is not travelling", but we can't accept it.

January 19, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/alisa488338

Waiting for a train isn`t a journey

February 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

That's close, but still "a journey" is a noun that translates to "podróż", not the gerund form "podróżowanie".

February 24, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ashibaal

Including such sentences in the course is stupid. There is no meaning to it.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Simone76

It has a perfect meaning, knowing reality in Poland... Plus, the sentence is grammatically correct, so deal with it.

November 28, 2016
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