"Wyt ti'n gallu nofio yn y pwll nofio?"

Translation:Are you able to swim in the swimming pool?

February 19, 2016

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

Is pwll alone like a natural pool, a sort of pond?

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

Pwll means pond or pool and (at least in my dialect) a mine can be referred to as a "pwll" typically with a substance coming after it i.e "Pwll glo" being a coal mine or more literally a "Pool of coal".

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

Pwll Mawr (Big Pit) is the name of site of the National Coal Musuem (http://www.amgueddfacymru.ac.uk/bigpit/) in Blaenafon.

Well worth a visit, especially as entry is free!

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

Now that is interesting. In the US, old quarries will sometimes become swimming holes, when they fill with water. I wonder if that is what happened in Wales as well.

February 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

Yeah, check out the Blue Lagoon in Abereiddi. It's an old quarry that's now filled by the sea and is used by adventure groups, swimmers and divers (though the signs advise against that last one as it's dangerous): http://www.pembrokeshirecoast.org.uk/Default.asp?pid=628&LangID=2

March 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JD.Hogan-Davies

My original (snarky) thought was, "No, but I can swim in the fridge." On a more serious note, could this kind of sentence construction be used in a sense of whether people can generally swim in the swimming pool? For example, "There's a swimming pool at the hotel." "Oh...can you swim in the swimming pool?" In other words, something like a less formal idea of "can one swim..."?

November 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

Yes, it can. If you call the person you're talking to ti, then Wyt ti'n gallu nofio yn y pwll nofio? is the normal way of asking "Can you/one...". In some dialects chi is reserved for this "one", so Dych chi'n gallu nofio yn y pwll nofio?, but that's uncommon.

November 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

No, this is asking about ability (gallu/medru) to swim, not permission (cael) to swim.

November 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/shwmae

In theory maybe, but in practise gallu is used for permission all the time.

November 12, 2018
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