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  5. "Owen ydy fy ngŵr."

"Owen ydy fy ngŵr."

Translation:Owen is my husband.

February 21, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blueandnerdy

If Owen is your husband, I hope you like turnips...


[deactivated user]

    Actually, Owen is married to pannas.


    [deactivated user]

      So gŵ?r = husband and gwraig = wife ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
      Mod
      • 2706

      Why is the subject first here? Emphasis?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

      Yes it is the emphatic structure which we use when saying that something/someone is something.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewSke1

      The same as when we learned to say things like "Mecanic dw i" and "Dewi Lingo dych chi" earlier.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PannasOwen

      Aaaaaaaaaand what is your favorite vegetable


      [deactivated user]

        May be Pannas is Owen's wife's maiden name?..


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NearGlue

        Why is there no Mae?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

        Because this is an emphatic sentence i.e the most important aspect of the sentence is placed first for emphasis. In this construction "ydy" is the verb "is" and it replaces "mae".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NearGlue

        Could I say "Mae Owen yn fy ngwr." and still have generally the same meaning?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

        No, not here since (and I can't remember the fancy word for it) this sentence is used to equate one thing to another thing i.e that "Owen" = "My husband" therefore you need to use the emphatic construction here.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btopps

        So "ng" can make a "sh" sound?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

        No, Ng is the same as the English Ng except the g is not repronounced. The audio sounds normal to me so where have you got this idea from?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btopps

        On my PC via the web it had a "sh" sound, though now listening to it in my phone it sounds right. Weird.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btopps

        Actually just tried again - when you hover off and get the hint for "ngwr", it is pronounced with a "sh" sound. I reported it.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PookaGar

        Same here, also reported.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

        Since the whole point of this structure (A ydy B) is to indicate an identity between A and B, surely this sentence can also mean "My husband is Owen"? In fact, isn't that more likely to be the case, since in identification sentences Welsh normally puts the important/new information of the left side of the equation, English on the right? (Prifddinas Cymru ydy Caerdydd = Cardiff is the capital of Wales) versus (Caerdydd ydy prifddinas Cymru = The capital of Wales is Cardiff).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

        "Owen is my husband"="Owen ydy fy ngŵr (i)". "My husband is Owen"="Fy ngŵr (i) ydy Owen"


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

        Yes, but there you're talking about focused rather than identification sentences (even though those happen to be identification sentences too).

        In focused sentences the element that is being focused upon comes at the head of the Welsh sentence, and does so even in non-identification sentences.

        Thus, Ar y bwrdd mae dy frecwast (di) = Your breakfast's on the table. (Here I have used bold to indicate the emphatic intonation that is used in English).


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

        I would never translate "Owen ydy fy ngŵr" as "My husband is Owen".


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

        But you might translate it as "My husband is Owen" (?)

        -- Weles i dy ŵr di, Tom. (I saw your husband, Tom.)

        --Owen ydy fy ngŵr i! (My husband is Owen!)

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