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  5. "W środę jemy razem."

"W środę jemy razem."

Translation:We are eating together on Wednesday.

February 21, 2016

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alantrousers

I'm just wondering about this. Does this actually we "We eat together on Wednesday" in the sense of "We are going to eat together this coming Wednesday specifically", using the present tense "we eat" for future appointments, or would it be better translated as "We eat together on Wednesdays", meaning as a general rule we eat together? If it is the former, then that means that in Polish we can use the present tense with a future meaning, as in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

Yes we use present tense in future meaning.

And this sentence may and probably is supposed to ""We are going to eat together this coming Wednesday", although, "next" or "this" is missing,

which leads me to think that "We eat together on Wednesdays", can be also possible translation, although, "W środy jemy razem." is more clear in this meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/y_ddraig_las

In English if it's a one off it would be 'We will eat together on Wednesday" If it's a regular thing we say "We eat together on Wednesdays" Would I be write in understanding that the Polish can mean either here and we infer which from context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Actually I think that "We are eating together on Wednesday" will be a lot better English translation, as the current one suggests to people that this is a habitual thing.

But the habitual thing, "on Wednesdays", should also use plural "w środy".

So this is a one off thing, 'next Wednesday' most probably.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/br0d4
Mod
  • 1867

As a general rule, it would be "W środy (plural) jemy razem."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alantrousers

I see. How about "W środach..." - what would that mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/br0d4
Mod
  • 1867

It would mean "in a village (or restaurant) named Środy", which would be a bit strange, because in Poland there is plenty of villages that are named after a day of the week (it is the day of the week when, in ancient times, the weekly fair was held there). But I suppose that all, or maybe 99% of them, have names in singular: f.ex. Środa (sing,) - not Środy (pl.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immery

somebody could write a book called "Środy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Euhan1

Just like Dushanbe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Woah, that was an interesting thing to learn that it was called after Monday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hemilioxk

Could someone explain me why is it accusative rather than locative (since the " w ")?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Days of the week, and the word "weekend", are exceptions. Despite meaning "in", they use Accusative.

Although Accusative is used for "w" when it means some movement "in", "into" something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvesAB

Is this true for this specific preposition, to all prepositions or to all situations?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I think only here.

And by the way, it's not even that strange, in English there's also "in January" but "on Tuesday".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvesAB

Got it. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/br0d4
Mod
  • 1867

Yes. Preposition "w" joins nouns in accusative or locative:

  • accusative, when talking about defined moment in time, or place of some activity, target of some movement or activity, Eg: "Spotykamy się w środę" (accusative) "We meet on Wednesday"; "Jedziemy w góry" (accusative) "We go to the mountains".
  • locative, when talking about localisation, placement, being inside of something, in a country, city, region etc. Eg.: if Środa was a name of village (which is quite possible), it would be "w Środzie" (locative); "Jesteśmy w górach" (locative) "We are in the mountains"

More about preposition "w" (in Polish)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oliver536732

I selected "we eat together on a wednesday". Why is this wrong (and what would the Polish sentence of my translation look like)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aGABT31

The hints give both "together" and "time": is this indicating that the "together" is referring to a (meeting) time, or are there two totally different meanings to the word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/br0d4
Mod
  • 1867

These are completely different words.

"razem" (together) is an adverb, it has no derived forms.

But "razem" is also the instrumental case of the noun "raz" (one time, once). This probably should not be in the hints, because it is rarely used alone, it belongs for example to a fixed phrase "innym razem" (another time) Also "raz" is a another noun: case, circumstance, situation. There is also "raz" main numeral (one), and multiplicative numeral (one fold). From that numeral there is a derived noun, also written "raz", but meaning "one lash", "one hit".

As you see, "raz" are 3 completely different nouns + 2 numerals, and one of the forms of the noun, "razem" (time) has the same spelling as the adverb "razem" (together).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

For the first 20 seconds I had not a slightest clue where the heck did the hint "time" come from.

Then I realized, that it's Instrumental of 'raz', meaning 'one time', like "Zrobiłem to dobrze za pierwszym razem" (I did it well the first time I tried).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BernardoFo527982

'w środę razem jemy' would be correct? I keep thinking the adverb should come before the word it describes, but I know it is not always. Sorry for asking so many questions about adverb order :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/br0d4
Mod
  • 1867

It is generally not natural, but in some context it could be correct. Remember, that in Polish the information that is the most important comes as the last word in a phrase (in some cases it may be the first word in a phrase, too).

So, if you enumerate what is planned to be done on certain days, it may be correct:

"W poniedziałek mam cały dzień konferencję. We wtorek ty jedziesz do rodziców. W środę razem jemy. W czwartek idziemy do kina." = On Monday I have a conference the whole day. On Tuesday you go to see your parents. On Wednesday we eat together. On Thursday we go to cinema.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hereandthere715

What would this sentence look like if it meant, "We are eating together inside."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

"Jemy razem w środku."

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