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"Aún quedaba pan y vino."

Translation:There still was bread and wine.

5 years ago

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/zopilotes

and, now that I think about, two things remained, so why not quedaban?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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In English there are quite a few cases in which two things count as one unit and are treated that way grammatically. For example, fish and chips. Maybe that's true in Spanish also.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchyuthanS

That goes well when the two things go together- like fish and chips or bread and butter, but to things that don't go together, does it still apply?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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After a year of thinking: If the brain of the speaker puts them together as a unit, yes. Certainly many people think of 'meal units' like bread and wine as one thing. Likewise, peas and carrots!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Duolingo accepts: Bread and wine were still left. This is clearer and preferable to the "official" posted translation. Quedar = to be left over in the sense that something is remaining, not that something is forgotten. FYI: this is quedar in the imperfect tense. Newbie confusion: when does one use quedar vs. dejar? I left my hat in the car. = Dejé mi sombrero en el coche.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ying56

Thanks -I found in wordreference.com Quedar =haber todavía) to be left. ¿Queda algo de la cena? Is there any dinner left? No queda ninguno there is none left.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AussieFruitNinja
AussieFruitNinja
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(Not that you need it now, but ...) My sense is - two senses of "left" - Dejar - act of leaving some thing in some place; Quedar(se?) - being left/remaining in some place

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamdorf

But not "there was bread and wine still left". Which to me is an an example in english of taking "bread and wine" as a singular item. Oh well.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

Man cannot live on bread and wine alone!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

But we take this in remembrance of Him. thumbsup

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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Una barra de pan, un jarro de vino, y tú.

Aún quedaba pan y vino, pero ya te habías ido.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgathaSmith13

It sounded like the person saying it had a little to much vino

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Il-2
Il-2
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Why is "There still were bread and wine" wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Even though the official Duo translation is "There still was bread and wine," I believe that's incorrect. I acknowledge that the meaning is conveyed well enough. However, omitting anything along the lines of "remaining" or "left" is problematic for a proper translation. (And that's also the issue with your proposed translation, from my point of view.) Otherwise, we should not be using quedar in this sentence. That verb clearly suggests something remained. Without that element, the sentence reduces to "Aún hubía pan y vino."

The simplest translation for this sentence, again in my view, would be, "Bread and wine still remained." It's simple, direct and preserves the fundamental elements of the original. If you feel the imperfect needs better representation, you could say, "The bread and wine was still remaining." Either way, I would like to see something of quedar in the translation.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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I don't why it is wrong and maybe it isn't, but it sounds strange to me as a native English speaker. Are you a native English speaker?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Il-2
Il-2
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No, I'm not, and that's why I decided to ask, if my variant was right. :) Though it seemed gramatically plausible to me, it was marked wrong and nobody had asked the same question before me. Looks like you're definitely right and nobody says the phrase like this. Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michaelheuton0

bread and wine are pleural, so there were still bread and wine should be accepted

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ddddan
ddddan
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Is this not correct: "There was even bread and wine left." ? If not, how would the English sentence I have given be properly translated?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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It's not quite right. In Spanish that would be "Quedaba hasta pan y vino".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

"There was bread and wine left over" or, "There was still some bread and wine" are two possibilities in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zopilotes

It is a past tense, so "bread and water still remainED.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynne_bond

I have read the discussion below but still do not understand why "quedaba" rather than "quedaban" should be use with this translation. Two things remain (both bread and wine)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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That is a good question. I just found this example in my old Schaum's Spanish Grammar: Ahora me quedan solo dos. Quedan is plural. Seems like it should be here also. I don't know the answer. Anyone, anyone?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Il-2
Il-2
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Why is "There still were bread and wine" wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

Hi, because you need to use "was" instead of were. They are two singular objects not plural. There was still bread and wine or There still was bread and wine. If you were talking about something plural remaining then were is fine, for example, There were still bananas/There still were bananas etc. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VoyTech.Z
VoyTech.Z
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If so, why do you need to say "There were Tom and Jerry" rather than "There was Tom and Jerry"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

I'm not sure I would say "There were Tom and Jerry" I think I'd still use was. However maybe they are being considered as a plural and therefore "were" is used. For example, "Who was at the party?" "There was David, there were the Smiths, there were Tom and Jerry" etc.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

The cartoon characters Tom and Jerry would be quite a disaster at a party!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossanaas
Rossanaas
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Could anybody kindly explain what is the difference between au'n and aun without apostrophe? I don't get it, and why did they (the Spanish speakers) need two practically equal words meaning nearly the same???

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SFJuan

There is a good explanation at Aún vs. Aun: http://spanish.about.com/od/adverbs/a/aun.htm

They have different meanings. aún generally is used to indicate that an action or status is continuing (still or yet) while aun does not mean this. Although both can be sometimes translated as even, aun means even in the sense of included/including (e.g., even dogs won't eat it), while aún means even in the sense of still (e.g. we have even/still more in the back). Hope this helps.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossanaas
Rossanaas
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Thank you, somewhat clearer now, still it is complicated, also because the translation is in English which is not my mother tounge. I should better look what is written in Russian, at least in this case.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Il-2
Il-2
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http://hispablog.ru/?p=1549 Here it's in Russian! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rossanaas
Rossanaas
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Oh, thank you so much!!! :-))

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterDowns

In English, word position and punctuation could change the meaning of the sentence. 'Still, there was bread and wine' would mean there was nothing else, but at least there was bread and wine. 'There still was bread wine,' would mean there had been other food that was eaten at the same meal, but it was gone and only bread and wine were left over. How would the difference between the two be expressed in Spanish? Would it be with the verb form?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Personally, I think you're overthinking the English. Certainly, with context, punctuation, word order and intonation one can convey somewhat different meanings with a single sentence. However, without any context, I doubt you would get 20 native English speakers to agree on a single interpretation/meaning for either one of your constructions.

So, to answer your question about the Spanish, I think you'd rely upon context, intonation, word order and possibly other verbs (había?) to communicate differences in meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zopilotes

aun is different from au'n

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwarsha
mwarsha
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I translated this as :"bread and wine still remains". It's old fashioned but still seems accurate.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pablo-Enzo

Your sentence is in present tense instead of imperfect past.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craig.zar210

still it stayed bread and wine.....?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

There was still bread and wine (implying remaining / left over). However 'IS' should be accepted as its an ongoing state of being.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbelKidane

But it's talking about the past. It could be a discussion about an earlier time. For example:

"Not many people came to last Sunday's Mass. At the end, there was still bread and wine."

You certainly wouldn't use "is" there.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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To Craig.zar: "still it stayed bread and wine" could be used as a sentence in English if someone was trying to turn bread and wine into something else, like cake and milk, maybe as a magic act or as a miracle. When they could not do it, then you could say your sentence. Your sentence means that the bread and wine remained as bread and wine and did not turn into something else.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zopilotes

very interesting interpretation. But it makes little sense in everyday English, unless it is about a failed magician!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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How about: Even bread and wine were left.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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I would say this is not correct. In Spanish, that would be more like "Hasta quedaba pan y vino".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babsblabs
babsblabs
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Thank you for your input. I need to study this more!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/travellers2

"There still was bread" does not sound right, THEREFORE it should only be "there was still bread"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvaOdeh

Doesn't work properly

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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What is it that does not work properly?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/avromeo
avromeo
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Como Marcelino

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VoyTech.Z
VoyTech.Z
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What is wrong with "B read and wine still were remaining"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnthonyL4

"Even bread and wine was remaining" did not work

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balios
balios
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I believe aún only means "even" when used in comparatives, like aún más or aún mejor. A native speaker could help here, but I think your "even bread..." would use incluso.

Edit: I see now that Luis suggested "Hasta quedaba pan y vino" for "Even bread and wine were left."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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These things can be confusing because in many cases, usage attempts to mirror the MENTAL PROCESS of a speaker. Now, does the speaker think of bread and wine as one thing or two things? You don't really know, so the best you can do is try to arrive at what a typical speaker would mean. Bread and wine are often lumped together as if they were one thing, so people usually treat them as one. But would you be wrong to treat them as two? No.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeMcPeak

I'm not sure how you're supposed to be able to tell that the answer is "Aún quedaba pan y vino" and not "Aunque daba pan y vino" when it only gives you the audio.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonWanmaker

Can't I say: I had still bread and wine

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anitavs1941

I question the word order. If you put the stress on still you can put it first in the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cooperoto

Can someone explain to me the difference between "aún" and "todavía"? I loosely get why quedar was used instead of haber but "aún" isn't a word I ever really heard in school. Is there other meanings for it as well besides "still"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Not really. The two are basically synonymous. It's possible there may be regional preferences for one versus the other (perhaps that's why you didn't hear "aún"). Both can be used where English calls for "still" or "yet." In comparative situations, the two can be used to mean "even" in the sense of "even more," "even less," "even further," etc. Note that "still" works just as well as "even" in those cases.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RKehle

I have two spanish-english dictionaries, neither give "still" as a translation of "aún", and lists only "even", which doesn't make sense. "Aunque" > although; even though, might make sense, but it seems to me "todavia" is more appropriate. Comments?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

Your dictionaries are incomplete. Aún (with accent) means "still" or "yet." Aun (without accent) means "even." There are times when "still" and "even" can be used interchangeably, but that's an issue with English more than Spanish. Aunque is yet another different word, though it clearly shares a common root. Todavia ought to work just fine as well, but I don't know if it's more or less appropriate. I'm guessing it's not, since Duo didn't choose to use it here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RajivSriva4

"Still bread and wine was remaining" which also may explain use of singular

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shibboleth

'Although bread and wine remained' SAME THING!

5 years ago