"Francuz spróbuje polskiego jedzenia."

Translation:The French man will try Polish food.

February 22, 2016

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanette364461

As a native English speaker, not sure the term "Frenchman" is really used. Sounds like the start of a bad, and possibly rude, joke. Typically it would be a or the "French man"

February 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Hmmm. Well ok, changed now.

February 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Davey944676

Yes, I know what you mean. "Frenchman" automatically sounds disparaging in some way.

It's possibly (in my case at least) a result of only ever hearing the term used in a sneering way in period films, where Britain is at war with France.

Even in one Victorian, Sherlock Holmes-type drama, I can recall something much like, "You, Sir, have the manners of a Frenchman!!"

That's duelling-talk, that is...:)

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanette364461

Ouch!

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/israellai

Hmm it's not the first time I'm seeing this. What's the genetive doing here? :/

February 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

Well according to wsjp.pl próbować takes different cases depending on the meaning.

  • try to achieve something, to do something - genitive or infinitive

  • test something, decide what it is worth - accusative, or sentence beginning with "czy"/ if

  • try a taste of the food - genitive

  • try something new, to see how ir it like - genitive

  • to recherse - accusative

I think in casual speak it gets blurred. It can be seen as related to "a part" meaning of genitive

February 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/israellai

Thanks! That is awesome. Well at least it takes different cases for different meanings, unlike the even more confusing chcieć, which has only one meaning but takes genetive for abstract objects...

February 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

I think the mixed nature of chcieć comes from

To describe a part of something - "kawałek(nom.) chleba (gen.)" [a piece of bread]; "odcinek(nom.) serialu (gen.)" [an episode of tv-series]. Because the genitive means a part of something whole, the use of case can change the meaning of phrase: "wsyp sól(acc.) do zupy" [Pour the salt (all the salt that you have) into the soup] - "wsyp soli(gen.) do zupy" [Pour some salt into the soup]; "zjedli (cały) chleb(acc.)" [they ate (the whole) brad (a whole loaf or all the available bread)] - "zjedli (trochę) chleba(gen.)" [they ate (some) bread] (the use of cały/trochę is optional - without it the phrase means the same, but with them it is clearer)

( copied form post by @br0d4)

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/br0d4
Mod
  • 1313

Do not get misguided by the name of the case, the use of Genitive in Polish language is much broader than the name of the case might suggest. Genitive is used:

  • In negations - "ojciec(nom.) nie ma koszuli(gen.)" [father has no shirt], "nie ma chleba(gen.)" [there is no bread]. There are situations to express negation without Genitive ("żaden ptak(nom.) nie śpiewa" [no bird is singing], "to nie pies(nom.)" [this is not a dog], "to nie jest ani pies(nom.) ani kot(nom.)" [it is neither a dog nor a cat]) - but you should probably remember that the basic form of negation is with Genitive.

  • To describe ownership when used with a noun - "koszula(nom.) ojca (gen.)" [the shirt of the father]. But when the ownership is expressed with a pronoun, the case of pronoun has to be the same as case of possessed noun "moja(nom.) koszula(nom.)" [my shirt], "nie ma mojej(gen.) koszuli(gen.)" [there is not my shirt].

  • To describe a part of something - "kawałek(nom.) chleba (gen.)" [a piece of bread]; "odcinek(nom.) serialu (gen.)" [an episode of tv-series]. Because the genitive means a part of something whole, the use of case can change the meaning of phrase: "wsyp sól(acc.) do zupy" [Pour the salt (all the salt that you have) into the soup] - "wsyp soli(gen.) do zupy" [Pour some salt into the soup]; "zjedli (cały) chleb(acc.)" [they ate (the whole) brad (a whole loaf or all the available bread)] - "zjedli (trochę) chleba(gen.)" [they ate (some) bread] (the use of cały/trochę is optional - without it the phrase means the same, but with them it is clearer)

  • In comparisons - "bułka(nom.) lepsza od chleba(gen.)" [A roll better than bread]

  • To express separation from sth/sb - "oddzielić dziecko(acc.) od matki(gen.)" [to separate a child from the mother], "wyjąć zapałkę(acc.) z pudełka(gen.)" [to take a match out of the box].

  • Many prepositions require that the following noun is in Genitive case: "od" [from], "z" [from, off, out of] (attention: "z" also means [with] - but in that meaning the Instrumental case is required), "do" [to], "dla" [for], "u" [at], "bez" [without], "prócz" [except], "oprócz" [except], "obok" [by], "koło" [by], "około" [about, at about], "naokoło" [around], "blisko" [near, close to], "wśród" [between, in between], "znad" [from above], "spod" [from under], "naprzeciw" [in front of], "naprzeciwko" [in front of, opposite], "podczas" [during], "według" [acccording to], "zamiast" [instead of]. Samples: "od domu(gen.) do domu(gen.)" [from house to house], "dla mojej(gen.) babci(gen.)" [for my grandma], "spotkamy się około siódmej(gen.)" [we meet at about seven o'clock], "jesteś naprzeciwko Sądu(gen.)" [you are in the front of the Court].

  • In Polish language, the verb rules the case of the noun used with it (sometimes there are more cases possible, each giving a different meaning to the phrase). There are verbs that require just Genitive - "używać narzędzia(gen.)" [to use a tool]; "udzielać wywiadu(gen.)" [to give an interview], "zabić drozda(gen.)" [to kill a mockingbird], "dolać oliwy(gen.) do ognia(gen., see above)" [to add fuel (oil) to the flames].

  • It is used to describe activities by the noun derived from verb, even if the original verb requires a noun in accusative: "czytanie(n.) książki(gen.)" [reading of a book] - "czytać(v.) książkę(acc.)" [to read a book]

ATTENTION: the form of Genitive singular case is often the same as Accusative plural or Nominative plural (see this thread ), or Genitive plural. You may like to see the tables here or here. Therefore, it is important to understand when Genitive singular/plural should be expected.

Genitive has taken the function of the Ablative case which existed in ancient Polish, but does not exist any more, and this may explain why it is a particularly difficult case. You may be also interested in this thread .

Disclaimer: I am not a linguist, so perhaps I have omitted some important use of Genitive. If I recall something, I will edit this post.

And, here is a list of more common verbs that require the use of genitive (the list was prepared by conor.raff):

  • bać się - to be afraid
  • brakować / braknąć - to be missing, to be insufficient
  • chcieć - to want
  • dokonywać / dokonać - to achieve
  • domagać się - to demand
  • dotyczyć - to apply to
  • dotykać / dotknąć - to be touching/ to touch
  • doznawać / doznać - to experience, to feel
  • lękać się, obawiać się - to be afraid
  • nienawidzić - to hate
  • oczekiwać - to wait for
  • odmawiać / odmówić - to refuse
  • pilnować - to guard
  • potrzebować - to need
  • pragnąć - to desire
  • próbować / spróbować - to be trying/ to try
  • słuchać - to listen
  • spodziewać się - to expect
  • szukać / poszukać - to look for
  • uczyć się / nauczyć się - to study/to learn
  • udzielać / udzielić - to grant
  • unikać / uniknąć - to avoid
  • używać / użyć - to be using/ to use
  • wymagać - to demand
  • wstydzić się - to be embarrassed
  • wystarczać / wystarczyć - to be sufficient
  • zabraniać / zabronić, zakazywać/ zakazać - to forbid
  • zapominać / zapomnieć - to forget
  • zazdrościć - to envy
  • żałować - to regret
  • życzyć - to wish
February 22, 2016
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