"Dych chi eisiau lemon?"

Translation:Do you want a lemon?

2/22/2016, 5:17:17 PM

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SpaghettiCorgi

All right, I've been thinking, when life gives you lemons, don't make lemonade! Make life take the lemons back! I don't want your stupid lemons! What am I supposed to do with these? I demand to see life's manager! Make life rue the day it thought it could give me lemons! Do you know who I am? I'm the person whose gonna burn your house down - with the lemons! I'm gonna get engineers to invent a combustible lemon that'll burn your house down!

12/2/2016, 8:47:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ella_Wren

Lol!

12/2/2016, 9:29:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/yhnqk
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Does this literally translate as 'you are (in want of) a lemon'? Trying to understand what grammatical function 'eisiau' serves in this sentence

2/22/2016, 5:17:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
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Eisiau is used to mean "To want" but isn't actually a verb. Really the best thing you can do is think of it just as "To want" just that it doesn't conjugate and doesn't take "yn".

2/22/2016, 5:43:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/yhnqk
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Alright, that clears it up :) Diolch!

2/22/2016, 5:54:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ella_Wren

When life gives you lemons, throw them at people..... haha, but, please, don't throw lemons at people, its not nice.

12/2/2016, 6:15:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
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I find myself not understanding these sentences. i get that eisiau means "want" but what does "dych chi" mean. I hadn't had those words before this and don't understand and the clue just gives "Do you want"....which word is the "do" and which is "you"?

1/15/2017, 3:18:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan
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"Dych" means "Are" and "Chi" means "you". Literally this sentence is "Are you liking lemons?" but since we don't say this in English we translate it as "Do you like lemons?". Also worth noting is that "Dych chi" also means "You are", we don't change the word order for questions like English does.

1/15/2017, 3:21:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jacquelinemmm
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So that means in speech a question is only differentiated by an inflection?

7/25/2017, 12:09:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
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Yes, although this sort of sentence is much more likely to be a question than a statement in speech.

Dych/(Dych) chi eisiau/(isio) lemon = You want a lemon

Dych/(Dach) chi eisiau/(isio) lemon? = Do you want a lemon?

(North Wales variants in brackets)

7/25/2017, 12:57:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/becky3086
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Thank you! Very helpful!

1/15/2017, 3:28:26 AM
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