https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blue_basket_girl

"Umm"s and "Er.."s in French

Salut! I say "umm" and "er..." A LOT! I just can't stop! I'm worried it might slip into my French, but I don't know if they say that in French, something different, or not at all. Thanks in advance!

~ItsFrenchEmily

February 23, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saelyria

I hear a lot of tsé (tu sais, used pretty much the same as "y'know?" in English), ben là (bien là, used kinda like "Well then") and ben don' (bien donc, kinda like "Soo...." at the start of sentences) as filler in Québec. Ben don' and ben là I think is more common there (though I can't imagine it would be weird to hear it in France), but tsé is used in France too. Québécois also like to just insert là's in random places (especially at the end of sentences as punctuation), which I'm pretty sure is just them.

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blue_basket_girl

Cool! Thanks!

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielleMi943459

to note: when I was very very briefly living in France I heard a lot of "tsé" as well but never "ben" or "don"....just to keep in mind Quebec and France difference...or at least not in these contexts

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrikhal

"hmmm" and "euh"

See here for more of this type.

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blue_basket_girl

Hmmm... merci !!!

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FinoForever

LOL

August 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akianeart

My french teacher actually lived in France and she said that they use the phrase, bon ben (ben is pronounced like baa BTW). Bon ben can mean well, umm, like, etc. It's typically used at the beginning or end of a sentence.

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blue_basket_girl

Bon ben, merci !!!

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChariseCurrier

I used a lot of "euhh," "bon ben," and adding "euh" to the end of words to drag them out when I was thinking (when I lived in France). E.g. "Alors-euh...t'sais...il y a plusiers facons de le dire, uh?" That reminds me: French people have a version of the Canadian "eh" for requesting agreement. It sounds like "uh" or a soft "ah". Alternatively, I've heard people use "quoi" instead at the end of a sentence. Another filler!

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blue_basket_girl

Awesome!

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saelyria

The "uh/ah" sound is usually transliterated as « hein », and is used like you described (like the Canadian "eh"). I hear it a lot in Québec like this:

« Ça c'est ben drôle, hein? » ("That's pretty funny, eh?")

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azylira

Hien looks a bit funny to me tho. I'd say it's more along the lines of "han" or "hein". I often see "hein" in casual written conversations (only texting and chatting) It can also be used on it's own as a question, meaning "quoi?" (what?)

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Saelyria

Oh, you're right, I mixed up my i and e, it should be « hein ». I started doing German on here and I guess thinking back to French got me mixed up. Edited!

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vadimfowler

They do say a lot of "quoi" and "quand meme" :)

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thiercy

Just a contribution to add the fact if you are looking for filler words you have as well

-"genre" which can be used pretty much in the same way as "like" (ex: Je l'ai regardé genre je comprenais pas = I looked at him like I didn't understand) or as "kind of" too (un genre de moine = a kind of monk)

-"hein" is an interjection you can use to insist on something, a bit like the emphasis you put in English by leaving the auxiliary do apparent. (Il parle Espagnol hein = he [really] does speak Spanish)

-"hmm" and "euh" can be used in any part of a sentence as fillers, especially when you need more time to find your words

-"tu vois" ou "tu sais" or "t'sé" can be used to insist on something, just like "you know" in English

-"en fait" can go nearly anywhere you like in a sentence, if you need to rephrase something it is very useful, pretty much like "actually" or "in fact" (Je crois qu'il m'a pas compris, en fait j'en suis sûr = I think he didn't get me, actually I'm sure he didn't).

-"quoi" or "quand même" can be used too, but only in the end of the sentence, to insist as well. I would say their use is not exctactly the same but similar enough to the use of "though" (il est grand quand même = he is tall though).

Hope that helps, have a great day!

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vadimfowler

Excellent review! Duo should make a lesson out of it! ;)

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blue_basket_girl

Wow! Thanks!

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mvrtins

I say "et" which means "and" in French and that seems to work just alright

February 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-BellaLuna-

Keep up the good work!

February 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielleMi943459

in France I heard a lot of - "euhhhh" - "hmmmmm" - "d'accord d'accord" - "hmmmm" - "alors"

February 24, 2016
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