"На обед я закажу рыбу и салат."

Translation:I will order fish and salad for lunch.

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexJudge
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Is there any reason "I am going to order fish and salad for lunch" shouldn't be accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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That would normally be rendered via a conjugated form of "собираться".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexJudge
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Hmmm. I suppose I don't understand the distinction being drawn between "I will" and "I am going to." They seem virtually interchangeable to me in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
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Duo tends to prefer translations that match the grammatical form as well as the meaning of the original, to the extent possible. That is the reason that strikes me that a report for your version could potentially be rejected. But maybe it's just been missed up to now; obviously there's not much difference in meaning.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillEverett
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The only difference between "I will order" and "I am going to order" is the degree of formality: "I am going to order" is more colloquial.

I would translate "На обед я собираюсь заказать рыбу и салат" as " For lunch I am planning to order fish and salad" (or "... I intend to order ..."). In other words, with собираться, it becomes slightly less definite (there is a possibility that I will change my mind).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillEverett
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Currently, the distinction between "I will" and "I am going to" for the simple future is purely the formality. The sense the "I will" is more definite probably is a remnant the previously enforced distinction that "I shall" is standard simple future and "I will" is the intense simple future (similarly, "will" was standard and "shall" was intensive for the second and third persons). See, for example, http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2013/09/will-versus-shall/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shall_and_will https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Going-to_future

Regarding "I'm about to ...", yes (how to translate "я собираюсь ..." depends on the context). In my understanding, there is not an equivalence between собираться and an English verb like there is between заказать and "to order." I also tend to understand собираться in the context of собирать, разбирать и т.д.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YTcassadyDodson
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also please accept "i'm ordering fish and salad for lunch" - americans (me) usually think and talk about what they're ordering/will order as if it's the present tense, and i usually say "i'm getting ()" hours before we do anything. The "for lunch" implies that it's not at the time of speaking, but rather in the time of whenever lunch is.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MuratNasyrov
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Doesn't accept "For dinner I will order fish and salad". Always dinner was translated as "Обед".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dotters

Dinner is «Ужин».

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillEverett
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I quote from my Random House unabridged dictionary:

dinner:

  1. the main meal of the day, eaten in the evening or at midday.

  2. a formal meal in honor or some occasion or person.

lunch:

  1. a light midday meal between breakfast and dinner; luncheon.

  2. any light meal or snack.

supper:

  1. the evening meal, often the principal meal of the day.

  2. any light evening meal, esp. one taken late in the evening.

When I lived in America, the usual three meals were breakfast, lunch, and supper. We had dinner in the middle of the day on Sundays and holidays. When a special occasion (such as a birthday) fell on a working day, we had dinner in the evening.

Now that I live in Russia, the usual three meals are breakfast, dinner, and a light supper. We sometimes have dinner in the evening, but then it is not ужин: it is a праздничный стол.

In recent years, lunch is becoming more common in Russia (ланч or бизнес-лаич).

Обед is not lunch and ужин is not dinner. Обед is dinner at midday or (more often) early afternoon. Ужин is supper (usually a light supper).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dmitry_Arch
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Being a native Russian, I must say that, in today's Russia, обед - whatever you call it in English - is always a midday meal, so it will only be fair to call it lunch to avoid confusion. It was not the case one hundred years ago when people could have обед any time from 3pm till late in the evening and, in some cases, it could last till 2am (there are plenty examples of that in the 19th century Russian literature). The evening meal in modern Russian is always called "ужин" whether you call it dinner (праздничный ужин) or supper (обычный ужин). In the past the word ужин primarily referred to the evening meal of farmers and working class people. I think the word is related to the verbs жать/пожинать (to harvest) and implies that you will eat what you've just harvested. Also in the 19th century Russians used the word полдник (from полдень - noon) to refer to a light midday meal or snack, but in the Soviet era its midday connotation was erased from people's memory and it is only used to refer to a snack that kids have in summer camps at about 4pm.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dotters

Fair enough! Although it seems the usage in the US nowadays is at the very least ambiguous, as you can see here: Harvard's Dialect Survey: Difference between "dinner" and "supper."

My native French bias, where "souper" has all but disappeared to be replaced by "dîner" around the time of last century's massive rural exodus (and where the word "souper" definitely has a countryside flavour to it), makes me wonder if that cultural rift along rural/urban lines is found in AmE as well.

In any case thank you for your comment, the answer isn't as categorical as I thought it to be!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillEverett
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Thanks for the link. Some questions that could have been asked would have city slickers scratching their heads: Is the worker on your farm a 'hired man' or a 'hired hand'?

Languages change. There are words taught in this course that didn't exist in Russian twenty years ago.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feyMorgaina
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If "dinner" refers to the midday meal, then I think it should be accepted (whether or not it will be is up to the course moderators). I generally call the meals breakfast, lunch, and dinner, but "dinner" refers to the midday meal in some places (according to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dinner).

Обед - https://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%9E%D0%B1%D0%B5%D0%B4

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterOlson3
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Is there any reason why "I will order a fish and salad for lunch" is not accepted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
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No. Report it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos
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BTW "I SHALL order fish and salad for lunch" was curiously not accepted, though it is preferred by many English, especially on formal occasions, or in poetry: "I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allajackson

Any reason "I will order the fish and salad for lunch" shouldn't be accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roman_Key
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"I will order in fish and salad for lunch." should be accepted.

2 months ago
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