"Wales are the champions."

Translation:Cymru yw'r pencampwyr.

2/24/2016, 2:45:17 AM

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/StephenDunscombe

I was always taught that if your statement is "The noun1 is noun2", the formulation is "Y noun2 ydy noun1" - always with the definite noun first. No?

2/24/2016, 2:45:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc
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If a particular part of the sentence is being emphasised, it comes to the front of the sentence, usually. Here, we want to emphasise Cymru over whomever we have just thrashed...

2/24/2016, 8:31:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Yottskry
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Italy's your best bet. Little chance with the others ;)

10/3/2018, 7:07:44 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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In Cornish, I was taught to put the new information first in such situations.

So it depends on what the question was.

"Who are the champions? Wales are. -- Cymru ydy'r pencampwyr."

"What is Wales? They're the champions. -- Y pencampwyr ydy Cymru."

Also remember that proper nouns are also definite (by definition -- there is only one Wales, it's not "a Wales").

Similarly I would expect "Meddyg yw Siân" (answering "What is Siân's profession?") vs. "Siân yw y meddyg" (answering "Which of them is the doctor?").

2/24/2016, 7:29:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/StephenDunscombe

Oh, yeah; you put new information first in Welsh too. Pull up the Welsh Wikipedia article on almost anything and the first sentence will be "One of the most famous Welsh horror novels of the 19th century ydy ARTICLE TITLE."

2/24/2016, 11:56:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dubulo
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The Welsh Wikipedia seems to be written by a very small team of active users - click "history" on the articles and the same names come up again and again and again. So you have to assume that the use of language there reflects a rather small number of people (and possibly some of them are learners), so might not necessarily be particularly representative.

10/27/2017, 11:05:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Beth743129

"Cymru nhw'r pencampwyr." ??? Must Wales always be singular? Why then not "pencampwr"?

4/11/2017, 9:35:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc
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nhw is not a verb - it is a pronoun 'they'.

As in English, when a team such as Wales/France/Canada/Spurs/Glamorgan, etc, play in a game or whatever they are normally referred to in the plural:

  • Morganwg yw'r pencampwyr eleni - Glamorgan are the champions this year.
4/11/2017, 9:48:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
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In British English. In American English, it's generally singular. Wales is the Champion. The United States is winning the basketball game.

1/19/2018, 4:35:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
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For your second example, it's the same in UK English, Wales is winning, Scotland is winnning ....etc

However in your first example the Welsh plural noun is used so 'is' wouldn't be possible.

1/19/2018, 7:16:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Yottskry
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"For your second example, it's the same in UK English, Wales is winning, Scotland is winnning ....etc"

I'm sorry, but I completely disagree! Usually in English it's "England ARE currently leading Argentina"; "England HAVE beaten Australia"; "Scotland are topping the group".

It's almost always plural, not singular in the UK.

10/3/2018, 7:09:21 PM
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