"Ihr seid gestern in den Park gegangen."

Translation:You went to the park yesterday.

December 27, 2013

15 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yana001

Why is it den and not dem? Is it accusative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galmes

In both Latin and German, "in" means into with accusative and simply in with dative (ok, ablative auf Lateinisch).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianJosh

i don't know exactly what the rule is called but when you are moving it is den but

when you put something in place and it doesn't tend to move, you use dem


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rose173982

Yesterday decided to come first and Duolingo got angry and stroke him out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garzvas

why not : Ihr seid gestern zum Park gegangen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thurid

because that would mean they went to the park and stood at the gates. If you go in, you say in. But this is not always true. for example: You have gone to the supermarket = Ihr seid zum Supermarkt gegangen. I think this is a special thing about parks, that "to" is translated to "in".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garzvas

deine Erklârung ist in meinen Verstand gegangen.Vielen Danken


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kumar.1989

The option for 'gegangen' does not include 'went'. It gives 'walked'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lorenagay

Well I wish I knew when "in" means "in" or "to" since DL marked me wrong for saying "You went into the park yesterday". Took one of my hearts, also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph516503

how do we know that "in" means to in this instance? I put "you walked in the park yesterday", and I'm not sure why this is wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ajna
  • 2713

Can't you translate it as "you went IN the park yesterday"? It seems pretty fine English to me, if you consider a big park that you might spend some time to explore or the like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariadelCa703168

I would really appreciate someone can explain why is not dative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ajna
  • 2713

Movement to usually takes the accusative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabb318_PHL

Lol I almost tried entering 'You went to them park yesterday' from the word bank. That's too much German for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/williasr

Is seid necessary here? If so, why?

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