"Llegaron donde nunca nadie había llegado antes."

Translation:They got to where no one else had ever gotten to before.

5 years ago

206 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/surrection75

isn't it "boldly gone"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

The word order is rigid and excludes right answers over and over...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

I will always get this one wrong as an American English speaker. I consider it very archaic tho it may be regional or English or something.I would like to add that the translation needs to further leave the literal and say: they went to where nobody else had ever gone. "got to" is not used in American English except in very archaic or humorous or intentionally stilted quests. this sounds more like a saying and should flow but just does not flow as translated.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KazzLewsader

I agree. "Got to" is bad English grammar.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcdewan
jcdewan
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Got to = reached. Worked for me!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

'I found that 'They had arrived where no one had arrived before' was accepted - I think it sounds better, but it's still clumsy!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RandallMiles
RandallMiles
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They just marked that wrong for me. 03Mar18.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nrabek

Arrived works but you have to include "ever"

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janie708094

Mine said gone was correct Then don't use llegar. ido would have made sense. l

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201
Iris150201
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Dang. It wasn't accepted for me.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marifabbri
Marifabbri
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I am agree with you

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike209223

Yea, that was right for me going to levels 2 and 3 just this morning. Sorry to say they didn’t like it testing out to level 4.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mathchoo

It is also spoken by those fluent in Hick.

"I gots to get me to somewheres I can get going and get on it"

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReedJenny22

It's not English English either!!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReedJenny22

It is definitely NOT English I can assure you!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

So and so:"Americans - do they speak English?"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

Yes

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryMills11

Plus, the "had ever gotten to before" is awkward also. "had ever gone before" is better. Using "llegaron" they seem to be implying they arrived at a location, and not achieved some goal. . .

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamMcC186879

Wouldn't reaching a specific point that most people never reach, like Everest base camp, be "had ever gotten to before?" "Had ever gone before" implies no one has tried to go there before. All I need to know is that this is acceptable Spanish. I do not care if it is acceptable English.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisDavie19

Im english. Definitely not english. I thought it must be american. Gotten? Never heard of it.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

'To ''get to'' your destination is common in UK English, though ''reach'' is preferable (my wise teacher's advice in the early 60's was to avoid the word ''get'' wherever possible). But ''gotten to'' is undeniably US English (the same teacher would have had us writing ''gotten is not a word'' on the blackboard until it was covered). Sadly, in click-the-tiles mode, it's the only choice the owl gave me.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joeTatt1
joeTatt1
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The past participle "gotten" is only used in the United States. In the UK we say "I have got" (often without using "got" at all), but not "I have gotten". This sentence which contains "got" and "gotten" sounds terrible to me and I would imagine to most educated speakers of standard English (US or otherwise). Also it makes a translation of the Spanish very difficult to follow.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

naDevvo' peghoS

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yerrick
Yerrick
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ugh don't try to make me learn a different language

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

I understand

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kalukuhan
kalukuhan
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Klingon?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

Qapla! - It's all you need to know in Klingon.

You might think it's crazy, but I actually used that word at work today.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I'm amazed no-one has picked up your spelling mistake.

As I'm sure you know, the word is " Qapla' ". (The apostrophe is a letter in Klingon.)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wwang.1

Ha!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luna_Tik

"Atreverse a ir a donde ningún hombre ha ido antes"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/porkrind94
porkrind94
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si, mi penamientos exacto! estan robando Star trek! jejej

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dfwgator
dfwgator
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That question is highly illogical.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Acott

"been to before" should be accepted in this translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

Agreed - if "they went" is accepted for "llegaron" then "had been" should be accepted for "había llegado". I think it conveys the meaning better than "had arrived" which sounds unnatural - perhaps a native Spanish speaker can confirm that is the way this would be understood?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vibratone
vibratone
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They went is simple past whereas had gone is past perfect which is the subject of the lesson and makes for weird sounding sentences in this case

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

I agree

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Logic has no place here!!! Stop it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

This sentence sounds horrid: "got to" is not commonly heard except in archaic and badly written plays in any part of America I have visited...or Canada. I know regional. It is grammatical in some groups. but it's not what is typically said in America by FAR.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j27tango
j27tango
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It may not be used often, but phrases like "You've got to be kidding!" or "You've got to have a special permit to enter." are perfectly acceptable American English. Perhaps not British English. I don't know about that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

You are right. Gracias. yet they mean "have to" . This sentence uses it more like : arrived at" . "Where has that boy 'got to'" with "got to" used for gone is what sounds archaic to me. I would use it for a kind of gentle humor when I can find something and don't want to get myself very concerned. A joke to lighten an annoying moment.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puffinwoman

Totally agree

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike209223

It’s knot the same thing, nothead.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisDavie19

Got to, is ok. Its gotten that is foreign to an english speaker.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

So what ? We say ''get to'' and ''got to'' but ''gotten'' is an abomination in the UK. Duo users this side of the Atlantic have to struggle with US-English terminology we wouldn't touch with a bargepole again and again.

6 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drepple
drepple
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Yes, and it sounds more natural.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bettybholmes

They arrived where no one ever had arrived before( this seems correct to me)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

I think they've updated the acceptable answers. They took this: "they arrived where no one had arrived before"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Where does the "else" come from because the other negation words seem to cover the existing ones we are supposed to translate. I say!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It seems to express the approximate idea OK in English, but you are right, there is no "else" in the Spanish. I think that would be something like "Llegaron donde nadie más había llegado antes."

Excuse me if I am repeating what I said 6 months ago (and what several others have suggested). The current "Translation" offered by DL at the top of this page - "They got to where no-one else had ever gotten to before" - is really weird here in the UK, but I suggest it is also far from standard English even for most Americans. It appears to be a combination of a clumsy reference to Star Trek (as brendals and Talca and Brian348233 and stephen.o suggested), and some form of clunky pseudo-street-lingo.

If you are curious, for "To boldly go where no man has gone before!", Google Translate offers: "¡Audazmente ir a donde ningún hombre haya ido antes!" . And I found a 2009 FanFiction story in Spanish "Dónde ningún hombre ha ido antes" .

Of course the strange wording à la Star Trek could be explained by it's translation into English from the 23rd Century records which were somehow mysteriously transported to Gene Roddenberry back in 1965. But seriously, my previous question was never answered. Perhaps a Spanish speaker would advise us: Is the Spanish here as clunky as the English (in order to complete the joke), or is it a case of El intento de humor simplemente cae sobre su culo ?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zazoom
Zazoom
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I agree! I translated the sentence like you did too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jdorlon

me too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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¡Bueno!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabe_LeMec
Gabe_LeMec
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This was my translation also, word for word. Submitted on Jul 5, 2014 to be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

I have suggested this to duo - it's still a bit odd but much less clumsy

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hollyxyzzy
hollyxyzzy
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I also put "they arrived where no one ever had arrived before" and it was still marked wrong.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kermar284

same here

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Myrne-

It was accepted for me, today.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/planegilmour

Me too.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rostellan
Rostellan
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And me!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

"They got to where no one else had ever gotten to before." What??? When did this bit of bad English appear? I am sure it wasn't here before (Nov 14 2013)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulsagra
paulsagra
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agreed! 'gotten' really grates on the nerves

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I guess those DL authors like to boldly go where no language teachers have ever gotten before! :-)

But of course, Paul, gotten is still used in English in the term ill-gotten (illicito); it seems appropriate to me! :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulsagra
paulsagra
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True! Have a lingot.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kalukuhan
kalukuhan
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I've gotten accustomed to it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gillpinnin

Horrible 'English'. I am still annoyed that they mark English spellings such as 'flavour' wrong and then this. Yes I am grateful for the free course and try not to get irritated. Once they marked 'mad' wrong for 'loco',and suggested 'nuts' instead. Oh dear...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LFCAlex

Americans gonna American.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brendals

as a casual trekster :-) i recognize this phrase, or at least one like it.... ha

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craig.zar210

come on, there is nothing more frustrating than correct translations being marked wrong!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brbert02
brbert02
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You could always pay a couple grand and take spanish classes at the local university. It's a free service part of that is the fact that you help improve it. I understand your frustration but I'm just sayin...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

brbert, thanks for bringing us back to reality. There are lots of community centre classe, and city-run courses available most everywhere for a whole lot cheaper than university classes. I personally learn much better in groups where I benefit from others' questions and others' mistakes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

Well, well, I'd say "Nuts". I thought this is a course for beginners...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Psychology researchers have suggested that frustration and annoyance can make what we learn more memorable. I would add humorous and rude. (Incidentally, it also indicates that my computer keyboard is stronger than it looks.)

There is really only one relevant question:
Does this help me learn [insert language here]?
Everything else in the Duolingo programme is fluff and frippery!

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jaroberts24

Never (nunca) is redundant right?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Not in Spanish. I suspect that is one reason why this funny sentence is here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Because multiple negatives are interpreted differently in English, "nunca" is translated as "ever".

Seriously (StarTrek notwithstanding), have we gotten the weird English because the Spanish sentence is equally weird? I think we ought to know.
I don't mind learning non-standard Spanish, but it is so difficult to find out whether this is so. Mind you, if the purpose is to make us think about it and generate lots of comments then I guess it succeeded. Personally, though, I just reckon some bored course author was "havin' a larf"! :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rarcher2010
rarcher2010
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Nuestro misio'n de 5 an~os, con fin de explorar unos nuevos frases extran~os; hallar los nuevos idiomas y las nuevas culturas...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathy70609

That translation is really lousy English. Just saying.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulSnatsky

You are right in my opinion. Sometime Duo falls into a rut. I hope Duo will change or alternately translate the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zwmoqqy

this has got to be the most stupid translation I have come across so far. Why not 'They arrived where nobody had arrived before'. Gotten??????? what sort of word is that?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

It's the irregular past participle of the word "go."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulSnatsky

Linda, you are correct about "gotten." I think "got" as the pp is also accepted as correct English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WalkerFurpahs

why is it that when i say you it did not accept

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jessegb

Isn't it just this idiom: They came where no one else had come before

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WimXL
WimXL
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Must it be " got to" ? They got where or they had gone where without to sounds ok in my ears or.....

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cemaluslu
cemaluslu
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i think "they reached where no one had reached before" can also be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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¿Donde estan, Trekkies?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MelissaSte7

Really awkward translation. No one would say it like that.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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Another accepted translation: “They reached where nobody had reached ever before“.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/growmoney

I just want to know where the "else" came from?????????

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annievlord

This is a very bad translation into English. British English would never use they got to... or " ever gotten to" Is this an American translation?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carmencita652544

If llegaron means “we arrived”, then how do you say “we arrive”? I don’t get where the past tense is indicated. Oops, meant “they arrived” vs. “they arrive”. But reply still works, thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j27tango
j27tango
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We arrive = llegamos, we arrived = llegamos. For most verbs, the first person plural conjugation is the same for present or preterite tense. It's one of those instances in Spanish where you have to figure out in context which one is intended.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma0044
norma0044
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There is no such word as "gotten", it is an American colloquialism and should not be accepted as correct grammar

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Samzara_
_Samzara_
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they had arrived where nobody had ever arrived before ?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelKami

I do believe that sentences in English should not end with a preposition, let alone two prepositions in a row.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cklp
Cklp
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Wtf. We arrived where no one else had been before.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaComp

I thought this was a terrible Americanism, it took me a long time to work it out. I wouldn't call it good English at all, and I don't think English people would say this - particularly "gotten"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

I'm sure it should be "Llegaron a donde..." ?

Anyway, "gotten" is a bad choice. Even in American English where it's used more often, 'gotten' means 'to obtain' something (an object), not 'to arrive' at a place. I'm a little disappointed to find it here in this example

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brendals

the word order should not be so sticky here... I translated it as "they came where no one had ever come before" and was counted wrong... I am protesting to the gods of duolingo :-) ha

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Brendals, came would be wrong in English. One comes toward the speaker and these people have gone or arrived where no one is, not even the speaker.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanVaka

Falta el Nunca

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrule
mrule
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It seems like this question is missing some translations. For me "they went where no one had gone before" was not accepted. I feel that is it acceptable to omit the "ever" and use a more idiomatic translation, and using both "ever" and "before" seems awkward and redundant in English.

A general form, which captures many ( but not all ) translations might be:

They [arrived (at,to),went (to),came to] where no one had (ever) [gone,been,come] (before).

where square brackets indicate mandatory substrings with multiple possibilities, and parenthesis indicate optional words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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They accept "They arrived where no one had arrived before." Come and go depend on the speaker's viewpoint, but arrived does not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crabilld
crabilld
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"They went where nobody had ever gone before" was accepted. Perhaps you needed the word "ever", or perhaps they updated it.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/William_Mark
William_Mark
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This one is kind of messy. I put stuff that was synonymous to the "correct" answer (I put "came to") but it marked it wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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They could have arrived in London and the speaker could be in New York. Then the speaker could not replace "arrived with came", because came means towards the speaker and went means away from the speaker, but arrived depends on a destination and not the speaker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustinTunl
JustinTunl
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As a Brit I have to comment- 'gotten' probably hasn't been in popular use over here since the late C18th!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rarcher2010
rarcher2010
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Yep, now us Yankees say 'gotten' but mostly up in them thar hills.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junolynn

"they went to where no one else had gone before" . . . marked wrong due to a "missing word" - "ever". I disagree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sophie1962

Nunca can also mean never.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Yes, but it is changed to "ever" to avoid a double negative.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamwtrow

gotten is not English!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iakobski

It doesn't matter how many exclamation marks (exclamation points) you use, it does not make it true. According to The Oxford English Dictionary: "As past participles of get, got and gotten both date back to Middle English. The form gotten is not used in British English but is very common in North American English."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anomalousjack

But 'gotten' is regionally diverse, used out of context in this sentence, and could have very easily been avoided. This is a site for a universal audience after all.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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"gotten" is definitely English. It is rarely used nowadays in most English-speaking areas, although it is common in the phrase "ill-gotten gains".

"got" and "gotten" are past participles of "get"; both date back to Middle English; both "got" and "gotten" are still used in the USA (particularly midlands and southern regions), where "got" relates to possession (eg "I have got a car" = "I have a car" or "I possess a car"), and "gotten" relates to acquisition (eg "I have gotten a car" = "I have obtained or acquired a car").

"garbage" is american "trash". We call it "rubbish" in England.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j27tango
j27tango
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What has gotten into you?????????????????? (for pamwtrow, not iakobski)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

Is it just me or is the audio on this sentence really crappy? I'm posting this here because I don't wanna file a report until I know it's actually an issue

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ludge
Ludge
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That is scary, but exciting.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephen.o
stephen.o
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Espacio... la frontera finale...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brian348233

Star Trek: the Next Generation intro in spanish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fy3LNkENMVg

Borg attack in spanish: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=orbYTdGQWXU

=)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cabin27

Why the double negative "nunca nadie"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Double negatives are used (or even required) for emphasis in Spanish. We don't do that in English.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puffinwoman

Now I have sent a question to my son-in-law about Klingon. What does Qapla mean?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Spelling! In Klingon it is " Qapla' ". The apostrophe is a letter. Also note that "Q" and "q" are different letters.
It is either a noun "success" or an exclamation "goodbye" or "farewell". [Ref: http://movies-dictionary.org/Klingon-to-English-Dictionary/]

Also note that "Qapla" means "download" in Zulu.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katstarwolf
katstarwolf
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Again, just curious, but who comes up with these translations? One of the things I've noticed is that the same sentence in Spanish can be translated (and accepted as correct) in seemingly more than one way. But any OTHER translation (even though it might be more accurate) other than that given, is marked wrong. ??? ~Kat

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qiu28p

They had got to where no one had ever got to before -is the same

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DebbieDrum

This translation is absolute garbage! Gotten is NOT English -

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hendo255

This is such a terrible sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WJWBerg

This is a messed up run on sentence that mixes tenses and prepositional phrases and runs on and on and was a waste of time for ...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesthoma20

Hardest I have seen.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolynClarke1

'gotten' is American slang, not English and the response seems to vary - i tried to answer it previously using got and the answer came up with 'gone'. In view of the negative comments it might be an idea to drop this one from the test

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiesaStienmetz

This is the dumbest most awkward sentence in all the lessons!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louised52

I agree with you!!!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daz270684

They got to where no one else had ever gotten to before - certainly not an answer in English

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Where is the "else"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulSnatsky

I think I had a good translation: "They had arrived to where no one had ever arrived before." I suggested that my translation should be accepted. Sometimes Duo demands that I have exactly the same translation as it did.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nickbishop69

"gotten" is not English. Surely llegar is to arrive.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/randtx

Where does the 'ever" come from? My translation to They reached where no on had reached before.. was marked wrong (because I left out the word ever)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I read (re-read) the other comments only to find that I answered this two months ago. I acknowledge that there is a lot of clutter to go through though. The relevant part was:

Because multiple negatives are interpreted differently in English, "nunca" is translated as "ever".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulSnatsky

I think the translation should include: "The arrived where / when nobody else had arrived before." This could also mean: "They had arrived/come before anybody else had come before." Context is important: is Duo talking about landing on a new planet or just coming to a party early? Also using the lazy words "get/got/gotten" is a poor choice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterSledm

I put "arrived", and it was okay, but I also put "no-one", and it said I missed a space (between "no" and "one"). That's how you know you're dealing with an algorithm, not a person. And the "got to"/"gotten to" is not at all idiomatic, or any less awkward, for British-English speakers, it's just one of DL's clumsy little sentences.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulSnatsky

I commented before and will quit after this on this subject. This is a sentence that I totally understand in Spanish, but the translation is the problem. A "correct" translation, IMO, is not so important as what the sentence means. We should not / cannot learn a language by translating it, no more than an infant can learn English by translating it into ... what? I give Duo great credit for trying to help us and I realize that the job is very difficult.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/louised52

nobody means the same thing as no one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnRobert60

What a poor English translation .GOTTEN what sort of lazy word is that !.English English takes precedent. They arrived where no one had been before.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliT.Firef
AliT.Firef
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If 'nunca nadie' doesn't mean 'no one ever' then I don't know what does.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Felix14578

awkward...

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LFCAlex

What a horrible sentence this is.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhilipAshf
PhilipAshf
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The translation of this is barely literate in English

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inivican
inivican
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Would "they arrived where nobody ever had arrived before" be correct?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReedJenny22

That is (bad) American English. I have answered in correct English

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IvarsVertu

simply terrible sentence in english. even google translate of "They arrived where no one had ever arrived before." sounds so much better. like a normal sentence, you know...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissesKiKi

"They arrived where no one had reached ever before." This is what was listed as the correct translation. This would never be constructed this way in English...

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yy4u2

Why not they had "arrived" to where no one ever had "arrived" before?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

?Estas bromeando?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeonGower
LeonGower
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if you're going to have "got to" twice in a sentence, you may want to include it in the drop down suggestions; at least once.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FernSavannah

Did Duo suggest "no 1" to anyone else (as opposed to "no one")? Well, I guess it's correct. Kind-of.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaulSnatsky

"Never anybody' and "nobody" are the same in English. Perhaps "nobody" is more concise, but as a N.E.S., both are perfectly correct.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreBarber

I can't wait to see the day that I'll use this phrase.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

There are numerous ways to order the words correctly in English on this one that are not accepted. it's trustrating tho we understand the issue for the managers of this question.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stringer16

"gotten to". Not exactly the queen's English

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elucidating

Space, the final frontier

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyPotts

Awful English!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeManeth

The translation is bad English

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian.Mckay

English people nevet say "gotten"!!!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

This one is very strange to me as few English speakers would ever say anything like that!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamMcC186879

Binker 52 who said "This one is very strange to me as few English speakers would ever say anything like that! " I can only reply THINK IN SPANISH, NOT ENGLISH. Learn sentences as natives would use them, not as gringos would translate them. It does not matter what the sentence sounds like in English. You have to think in Spanish. Good luck!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/binker52

I understand, but it still seems odd to me.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christine.483

Another nonsensical translation.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SinisaKuzet

"They reached where nobody ever had reached before" , woud this translation be correct?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisGray11

I had to write their answer down just to get it correct.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack872103

I wrote: They are where no one had ever gone before

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/downhill18cards

This is very strange English for the UK. Perhaps some Americas speak this way? But it's not helpful.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crabilld
crabilld
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I can confirm that it is strange for Americans too. But you're right... I do know a few people who speak with a thick Southern accent and could probably pull this off without raising any eyebrows. :) However, I'm sure this is just Duolingo going with a more direct translation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carol870492

To get it wrong because I didn't include "else"???

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carol870492

Did not accept arrived this time, but did before???

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icemule1
icemule1
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I left out the word "else" and was marked incorrect. Should be optional, reported Sept 4 2018

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ray896602

I hate this sentence MUCHO

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Warren.Gunther

Why is "No one else" required over jus "No one"

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gchristie1

Acceptable? Yes. Tongue-twistingly odd? Also yes. Just memorize what duoLingo says and move on...

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

The translation seems to take so much "poetic license" that I do not feel I have learned any Spanish at all

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgbryant

An approach on these that I take .. (There is in any given set of exercises only one or two like it) So I just screenshot the correct answer and if DL cycles back to it in the same set (highly likely) just give DL what it "wants" mark it for later study and move on.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ray896602

THIS IS THE UGLIEST ENGLISH SENTENCE I HAVE EVER READ.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce246939

why does it want "you arrived" instead of "they arrived"?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamMcC186879

Bruce, the "habia llegado" supports the subject "nadie," not "they." It says " "They arrived where no one had arrived before."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnsonNing

To me, "They went were no one had ever gone before" is the most idiomatic English translation. Accepted by DL!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

Where did Duo find "else" in the Spanish version of this sentence?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drskaiser
drskaiser
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I understand what was wrong with my answer, but good grief! Duo said the correct answer is "Y'all got to where no one had ever gone before."

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiceyokooko
spiceyokooko
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Terrible English grammatical sentence construction!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patriciagill

Not good English why nit arrived

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patriciagill

Not good English

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike209223

I’ve almost completed this entire course and I have experienced many weird turns (Duo-turns) during my trip here. This example here provides a prime example of that which I speak. I’m testing out of this particular (tense) and I am now testing to level 4. I worked the above exercise in moving to levels 2 and 3. In both cases the translation was “ they had arrived where no one else had arrived before”. Yea, it sounds stupid but that’s what they accepted. So now that’s wrong and and their correct version is even dumber. Thank goodness and all but I lack only 5 or 6 days and I will be through.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Belladonna65

Shakespeare wrote in Henry V1 ' Jack Cade hath gotten London Bridge' . We don't use hath any more in England , and both gotten and London Bridge have gone to America.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanRaishbr

a terrible answer! as a 50 year old native English speaker I have never and would never use this translation. " They have been where nobody else has been before" is what it should say IMHO

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma0044
norma0044
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THAT IS THE MOST APPALLING GRAMMAR.!!!!!!!!!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thylacaleo
Thylacaleo
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What a horrible English sentence construction.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash483872

The ever isn't needed, it still conveys the same message without the ever

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJoe7997

Woah, guys. Welcome to Gamestop!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJoe7997

Nice!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJoe7997

thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJoe7997

your welcome

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJoe7997

U guys r lame-os

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReedJenny22

that is American NOT English

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RachelKami

As an American I can proudly say I would NEVER use that translation!!!!!!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElAboudiMo

yooohooo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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Whatever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ekihoo

('frustrated' -tab lacking ?)

2 years ago
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