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https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

Gaelige vs. Gàidhlig

Hello.

From a linguistic point of view, I was speculating about the differences between Gaelige (Irish) and Gàidhlig (Scottish gealic). Both are q-Celtic languages. Could a speaker of Gaelige read Scottish literature in Gáidhlig? Could a speaker of Gealige understand someone speaking in Gáidhlig? E.i Could some one fluent in the former understand and self be understood in the latter?

2 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ConorHoughton
ConorHoughton
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I once went to a "Gaeilge 7 Gàidhlig" poetry evening with poets in both languages; I think everyone expected there'd be some level of mutual-intelligibility, as galaxyrocker notes the written language doesn't look impossibly different when the old spelling for Gaeilge is used. It quickly became obvious though there was no way anyone could understand anything and heartfelt speeches about how the love of poetry and drink transcended intelligibility were hastily penned and proclaimed while everyone politely ignored the one common language in the room.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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On the Irish language news show Nuacht TG4 there is on occasion a piece from the Scottish Gaelic language news show An Là (from BBC Alba) — these pieces are always subtitled in Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

So, you are saying that speakers of Gaelige don't understand speakers of Gàidhlig? The common language which the poets ignored, was it English?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorHoughton
ConorHoughton
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The Gaeligeors didn't understand the Gàidhligeors (?) and the Gàidhligeors didn't understand the Gaeiligeors and everyone understood English, but not a word of it was spoken; poems were read, pints were drunks, songs were sung, fiddles and whistles and bodhrans were played, it was a great evening, but one with very little pan-celtic comprehension.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

Ok, thank you for clarifying! Merci! Gracias! Ich danke Ihnen! Diolch yn fawr! Gracie! ☺

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

They might be able to with writinf, especially if the Irish speaker knew the old spellings. But generally no.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

Thank you very much for responding! ☺

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crussmor
crussmor
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There is a music program on TG4 called Port where the Scotish Julie Fowlis and Irish Muireann NicAmhlaoibh present the program,each speaking their respective Gaeilics as do musicians from both Ireland and Scotland - I myself don't find it impossible to read Gàidhlig but it talks a little bit of time to tune your ear to it.

Here is a you tube link to the program: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuAAC35yY6Y&list=PLlbJ-oimoJft-BcLH9-SjSGbsWsebbDHg

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marykatecoach

Go raibh míle maith agat! Is maith liom an cheoil éireinneach.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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Gaeilge iontach agat!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

Very interesting, I will listen to it. Thank you very much for responding! Merci! Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Antwort! Gracias! Gracie! Diolch yn fawr!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jan_Na
Jan_Na
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Hello, I am a native Irish (gaelic) speaker, and there are already three different dialects of Gaeilge in Ireland depending on the area in which you come from, which many Irish would struggle to understand. For example a person from Galway would hear a strong accent in a person from Donegal speaking Irish, one which they would already struggle to understand. Gaidhlig also has a very distinct different dialect, and the two languages have grown apart overtime. Not much of the languages is similar nowadays. It is as if trying to compare Spanish and Portugese-it is not the same language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robert_Andersson

Interesting. I have read about Spanish vs. Portuguese before, I know they are not the same language but they are not so different. According to Nationalencyklopedin, the Swedish national encyclopedia, Spanish and Portuguese are as different apart as Danish and Swedish. I, as a native speaker of Swedish, can understand written Danish to a large degree but often have trouble understanding spoken Danish . However, here are some people native in Swedish, often from the southern parts of the country, who easily understand Danish. Maybe speakers of Irish living in the north eastern parts of Ireland have the same relationship with speakers of Scottish gealic living in the south western parts of Scotland?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camac002

You are correct about the relationship of the north of Ireland and the south of Scotland. My dialect is Islay Scottish Gaelic, and I speak that with the people from Donegal (Ulster Irish) Arguably one of the biggest problems is simply accent and cadence of speech. Just like how Americans can struggle with a thick Glasgow accent. The first time I ever spoke with a Donegal Irishman, I found it quite difficult to understand and yet when I asked them to slow down just a little bit (lets say 25%), I could practically understand everything, or at least could figure out in the extra mental processing time that was available. I think this mirrors what people have told me about Swedish and Danish. Often, it's a matter of simple word selection too. A classic example of this is the primary word for 'speaking'. In Scotland is 'bruidhinn' and it is 'labhairt' in Ireland. However, everyone in Scotland knows the word 'labhairt' well. It just happens to not be the the main word used in regular conversation. It tends to get used in more formal situations. They also start to differ when it comes to words for "modern" things. In the beginning it was very easy for me to read an old Irish story, based on the vocabulary. However, modern topics with words dealing with elections, business, science etc. would have to be learned. Recent research by Professor Kevin Scannell showed that if an advanced Irish speaker learned an extra 100 Scottish words, they would understand greater than 85% of all text written in the Scottish digital corpus. In summary, I wish I could understand "other languages" as quickly as it took me to passively understand Irish to a high level (less than a week...)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jan_Na
Jan_Na
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Sorry for the late reply. Generally in the North Eastern parts of Ireland, Gaelic is not a very widely spoken language as this part of Ireland belongs to England, although Irish is still very common in Belfast. English is now the dominant language in Ireland, but Ireland is still used as 'the main language' in western areas of Ireland such as Connemara. However, the Northern Ireland accent while speaking English is similar, although not the same, as the Scottish accent while speaking English. The two accents however can still be distinctly recognised as either 'up north' or 'Scottish'. These two accents are similar due to the heavy influence of the Scottish planters (settlers) in Northern Ireland during the Ulster Plantations in 1609 (you could find out more about this if you google search 'ulster plantation 1609 king james') To answer your question about if Northern Ireland speakers have the same relationship with Scotland regarding Gaelic and Gaidhlig is no, the two languages have grown too far apart, and also Gaelic is not a language that is spoken fluently in Northern Ireland. They do however have a similar dialect while speaking English, although the two accents can be distinctly told apart.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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My granny was in Scotland and she said she understood all the signs. I also seen some video about the weather in Scots Gaelic and it sounded like Irish from far away.

As for Welsh...

1 year ago