"She is anxious for the holidays."

Translation:Ela está ansiosa pelas férias.

January 18, 2013

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pietvo

"Ela está ansiosa pelas férias", so here it uses "ansiosa por". In another example we have "Eu estou ansioso para ler estes livros", so "ansioso para". When do you use "por" and when "para" with ansioso?

March 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AlfSagen

I'm not a native speaker (neither Portuguese, nor English), but I would say this is more or less the same in both languages;

In English you'd say "anxious ABOUT (or FOR) something/-one", but "anxious TO get started". You select preposition by looking at what is following, whether it's a verb or a noun. In the cases where you'd use "to" in English, use 'para' in Portuguese (verb following). When you'd use "about" in English, go with 'por' in Portuguese (noun following).

Any natives, please feel free to correct me/improve the explanation!

March 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AlfSagen

Could anyone explain why 'ansioso' is conjugated to its feminine form here? Is this a "borderline case" because semantically the adjective is pointing back to a feminine person, or is there any clear rule? (I thought adjectives would always keep their "basic, non-conjugated form", i.e. masculine, when appearing alone and not describing a noun. Surely, we'd say "Dama de vermelho" and "A saia é amarelo" without changing the ending into feminine "a", right? So why are we changing it here??

March 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/pietvo

Adjectives conform to the entity/entities they describe, whether they be nouns or pronouns. A saia é amarela. As saias são amarelas. In the case of "Dama de vermelho" the lady is not red herself, but what she wears (I think). OK, I am not a native speaker but that's how I understand it.

March 4, 2014
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