https://www.duolingo.com/twono

The new way of indicating "Almost correct"

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I find the new way of indicating an almost correct word less intuitive than the old one. Earlier the word that wasn't 100% correct had a red background so it was easy to spot, but now it has the same background (green) as the rest of the sentence and an underline which I tend to ignore if in a rush. I understand that this new indicator works better for colour-blind people, but why not have both? A word that is "almost correct" should be underlined and have a red background. This way everyone will be happy.

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/WildSage
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What about red for wrong, green for correct and yellow for almost correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/idkhbtfm
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Yeah, that's what I was going to suggest, sort of like a stoplight.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Usagiboy7
Mod
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That's really cool that Duolingo is making the site more accessible for colorblind folks. I also really like the solution you've proposed, as my nephew cannot see green.

edited

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
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Didn't they always underline anyway?

In my opinion, things are not getting better. If you make a minor mistake, the sentence will be displayed in dark green against a green background. If you are doing timed practice and don't look down, it's easy to miss the difference between a perfect and a nearly perfect answer. I think before they displayed the corrected sentence against a white background. The argument for the new display is that the previous one was too confusing, but it feels like they don't care if I miss that I make spelling mistakes. Here is what it looks like:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
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Duo prefer that sometimes some think to be (said) correct when wrong rather than sometimes some think to be (said) wrong when correct. The same way they prefer that to see an incorrect answer accepted than a correct answer rejected...


N.B.: I disagree with Duo. ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lenkvist
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Thanks :) By the way, if you use an incorrect hyphen during the French course, the answer can be marked completely wrong. It doesn't underline/highlight the incorrect word either. But that could also be a new feature, because it doesn't seem to do that for a lot of wrong answers. Thought you might like to know.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jrikhal
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Thx! I'll test if it happens also with FR<->ES course (I fear).

The system struggle with spaces/punctuation/hyphens...

For example, spaces are, more or less, the indication of separation of words (for the system). So, for it, your answer as one word "petit-ami" when it wnats two words "petit" and "ami"... It gets lost... :(

The same way, it doesn't take at all punctuation. But punctuation sometimes totally change the meaning of the sentence. resulting for example in being impossible to teach "gérondif" in its various (and tricky) meanings:

  • Les enfants étant fatigués dorment.
    => The kids that are tired are sleeping.
  • Les enfants, étant fatigués, dorment.
    => The kids, being tired, are sleeping.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
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I think you're right, and I'm sad to see yet more dumbing-down. Now it's possible to consistently mistype a word in a way that the software interprets as a typo, and never notice it. It's not helping colourblind people at all; rather, it's just making the marking as difficult to spot for everyone else as it was for colourblind people in the first place.
When an answer is wrong, the box still turns red; this really isn't anything to do with making Duolingo more accessible to the colourblind, but everything to do with trying to increase retention of (mostly school-aged) users by lowering the standards of error-notification. I quite appreciate that Duo should want to increase retention, but I wish it could come up with ways of doing so that didn't lower the quality of the teaching.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveLando
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Yes, I miss it almost all the time!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iwc2ufan
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A great solution. I agree that the change is less than stellar, but your idea is great. I hope they try it out.

2 years ago
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