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  5. "Dych chi wedi blino?"

"Dych chi wedi blino?"

Translation:Are you tired?

February 29, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4okki

Which word in this sentence means what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Which word in this sentence means what?

Translated word for word, you have

  • dych "are"
  • chi "you" (several people, or one person you're speaking to politely)
  • wedi "after"
  • blino "tiring"

Where English expresses the perfect with "have" (e.g. I have written a book) on the metaphor of possession, Welsh instead talks about being after the action (e.g. dw i wedi ysgrifennu llyfr, literally "am I after writing book").

So they don't say "I have become tired" using a word that means "have", but rather using a word that means "after" -- "I am after becoming-tired", dw i wedi blino.

English usually expresses tiredness with an adjective rather than a verb (we don't say "I have tired" but "I am tired"), so it may be helpful to think of wedi blino as a single expression or unit meaning "tired".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictoriaRose675

Sooo helpful, thank you for the in depth!! Furiously scribbles notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephT.Madawela

Very interesting thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeasteadsOptions

This makes me wonder if I might be a little further along in grokking the original text of "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight" if I make it through this course. Welsh seems to have an interesting worldview.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PranayV.

Is the di in wedi a hard or a soft di? As in, is it sounded "the" or "Di (as in Didi from Dexter's Laboratory)"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

d has only one sound in Welsh, the same as the d in English do, dead, deed etc.

See the videos that we recommend in the course notes - look on the web for 'youtube welshplus pronunciation basics'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mravawishes

Why not ''dych chi'n" wedi blino? Is it because of the W?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why not ''dych chi'n" wedi blino? Is it because of the W?

wedi fits into the same grammatical "slot" as yn -- if you have one, you can't have the other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanIgnasi9

Is there a context in which blino can be used without wedi? I know blinedig is used without wedi, is there a subtlety that is lost in translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

In this context, blino is a verb-noun meaning 'tiring', as in 'to tire', 'getting tired':

  • Dw i'n blino. - I am getting tired.

The 'n/yn tells us that the action is continuing, incomplete.

Using wedi instead of yn marks the action as finished, complete - the action of 'getting tired' is over and I am now actually 'tired'.

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