1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "Una depresión."

"Una depresión."

Translation:A depression.

February 29, 2016

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theRealRabbit

"Depression" makes more sense than "A depression" in English, if your talking about the mental state. "A depression" would only ever be said for depressions in physical things -- like, "Your ass left a depression in my couch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippopigamus

You can say someone fell into a depression and mean they became depressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harry_Boyes

As opposed to falling into a depression left by your ass in the seat ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tommylockwood

I've always phrased it "falling into depression". I don't recall hearing anyone use an indefinite article like "a depression"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CodyORB

I've heard it being used if someone has had depression multiple times.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gehayi

No, I think that in that case you would just say that the person fell into depression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JakeParent

"I fell into a depression because my ass left such a big depression in the couch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris_Gooden

"a depression" is perfect English, if you are talking about "a depression of a plunger, or a syringe".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vicki.kura

Well said! Plus I love your dog.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kdammers

what kind of depression(s) is this? weather, psychological, economic, physical?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kirsten637255

It can mean all of those things. It's similar to how the word is used in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

Yes, but the LESSON was for medical, in which we commonly use "Depression" as a diagnosis. Doctors would say, "You're depressed," but write as a diagnosis, "Depression," not "A depression." I think that if a Hispanic person said, "Oh, my poor friend; he has a depression," I would be waiting to hear if he had a dent in his head.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AScam0

Thank you Kirsten :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orelion

Good question. I am wondering the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

Depression as a medical condition or a mood is not a countable noun. One either feels depressed or is diagnosed with depression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mortisimago

Psychiatrist here. We use "a depression" lots. There can be many kinds of depression: unipolar, bipolar, recurrent, chronic. I might say, "this looks like a bipolar depression" (a particular case). I hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clarkeve

Funny thing, "Una depresion" is not supposed to be "one depression" That would be a bit weird, instead you would say it as "Her/His/The depression" in english. And that's just how it works! weird, huh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannahsox

Is this referring to depression the illness or depression like an indentation in something (like a dimple or pothole)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ser_kay

It's found in the "medical" practice, so I'm pretty sure it's the illness.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pauline589211

Unless they are talking about checking for swelling (pressing will leave a depression)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Depresión has the same range of meanings as the English "depression", so it can refer to:

  1. The action of denting something.
  2. A dent.
  3. An economic depression.
  4. The neurological disorder.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pauline589211

Looks like it can mean several things, from physical to emotional. A depressed financial market, a depression left by pressing into something, the medically diagnosed depression. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/una%20depresion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hannahsox

Is this referring to depression the illness or depression like an indentation or hole (a dimple or pothole)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It can refer to either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tellislv

Is this an emotional state, or physical, or can it be both as in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It has basically the same range of meanings as the English "depression".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AliT.Firef

a bout of depression?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marc577250

If you said "I have a depression" in English, someone would say "where?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bartisaron

I'm not a geologist, but wouldn't "depresión" also mean "basin"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Just as a "basin" is a specific form of a geological "depression", so is the Spanish depresión a more general term. "Basin" in that meaning translates to cuenca.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateDizzy

Physical or emotional depression? Ambos?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvaSivenCo

No one in English ever says "a depression" when talking about emotions. It's a bout of depression, a period of depression, a depression episode etc. The only time it'd work would be if we're talking about different Types of depression, but still


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It doesn't have to be about the illness. Depresión has about the same range of meanings as the English "depression", which includes a dent in a surface.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BalzsMihly2

Para aquí estamos...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ochera

the of "depresion" is ambiguous


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonifaciu

Is it a complete sentence in English and in Spanish?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneBa

Nope. Verb missing. It's just an item of vocabulary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonifaciu

So why point is here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimoneBa

You're right... the full stop is kind of superfluous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonifaciu

I think it could be a complete sentence in Japanese. As a part of a haiku.

I see this page. Here is an error. A depression.

Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.