"Sorry, but I want to listen to this."

Translation:Sori, ond dw i eisiau wrando ar hyn.

February 29, 2016

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/KiwiCymraeg

Anyone know why gwrando gets mutated here? I use moyn so not sure of the rules with eisiau, but it would be 'moyn gwrando' not 'moyn wrando'.

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

There is no reason for gwrando to be mutated after either dw i eisiau... or dw i'n moyn.... Just report it as an error if it pops up again.

March 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

Rydw?

February 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ibisc

There are quite a few variations on dw i in common colloquial use: dw i; wi; dwi; rwy i; rydw i; wy; ... Which one is used varies by region and often also by age group, situation and so on. dw i is widely taught as a simple standard as it is understood by all speakers of Welsh even if they usually use something different themselves.

yr wyf; rwyf; rwyf i/fi; are also in common use in formal or semi-formal writing (essays and academic writing, and some media articles, for example) and in formal or semi-formal speech in presentations and meetings.

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils

This is beginning to sound like Irish and all of its differences between the various Gaeltachtai. Which actually brings up another question I had about Welsh: is there a Welsh word for a Welsh-speaking region, an equivalent to Gaeltacht?

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

Yep "Y Fro Cymraeg" is used for the Welsh speaking regions, but it doesn't have any official recognition like the Gaeltachtai

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ieuan-Jones

I believe Y Fro Gymraeg is used for the heartland regions.

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

The formal form of "dw"

February 29, 2016
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