"I do not like Pwllheli."

Translation:Dw i ddim yn hoffi Pwllheli.

March 1, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RozieToez

Are we goimg to learn licio in more exercises, or is it just being sprung in a few "select all correct answers" review questions without our having learned it?

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Well, you seem to have learned it already! I am pretty certain that I have seen it in some of the main sentences in the course, though, so it will come up from time to time as an alternative to hoffi.

July 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jehra2

I had never seen licio before this

July 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

licio? two words for like?

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Yes. Both are widely used all over Wales.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

South and North dialect, or just part of the entire Welsh language?

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

All over Wales, whichever one people prefer to use.

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swingbeatnik7

Okay, thank you :)

June 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattJones596690

my friend from north wales uses 'licio' so i taught myself to instinctively use 'hoffi' to get under his skin :).

January 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_Andersson

Dydw? I have heard of Rydw, dw but not dydw? Where/when do you use dydw instead of dw?

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

Well it's more traditional forms really(but they're still used today). Rydw= a positive statement i.e "Rydw i'n mynd i'r siop." (I am going to the shop.) Dydw (always pared with ddim)= a negative statement i.e "Dydw i ddim yn mynd i'r siop" (I am not going to the shop.) and lastly we have Ydw= a question i.e "Ydw i'n mynd i'r siop?" (Am I going to the shop?).
All of the other pronouns have these too, not just "Fi":
Fi: Rydw/Dydw/Ydw
Ti:Rwyt/Dwyt/Wyt
Chi:Ryda(y)ch?Dyda(y)ch/Yda(y)ch (The "Y"s in the brackets are sometimes in the place of the "a" before them)
Hi/Fo/Fe: Mae/Dydy/Ydy
Ni: Ryda(y)n/Dyda(y)n/Yda(y)n
Nhw:Maen/Dyda(y)n/Yda(y)n

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_Andersson

Ok, thank you very much for responding! Diolch yn fawr! Ich danke Ihnen für Ihre Antwort! ☺

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Dydw i ddim... is used in negative sentences. Some people use it, some don't. Similarly dydyn ni ddim..., dydych chi ddim.

dwyt ti ddim... and dydy/dyw e ddim... are always used and dydyn nhw ddim... is often used, too.

March 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robert_Andersson

Thank you for responding! Diolch yn fawr! ☺

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

I know that "Dydy hi/fo/fe" are always used (at least to be considered correct) because without the "Dydy" you would be using "Mae" instead which is the positive word.

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coriander18

Don't really see the relevance of the other comments ... I was just going to ask why the yn is in the sentence but not in the English translation.

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

Because English has no equivalent for "yn". It is an untranslatable verbal particle that connects a form of "Bod" to a noun, verb-noun or adjective. EDIT: most of the other comments refer to "Licio" an alternative word for "To like".

September 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Coriander18

Thanks I was wondering how come people were discussing what looks like them, they, he she it etc when we're only just learning I and you... unless this sentence comes in another unit that is. Hope I don't have to get my head round all this other stuff yet.

September 19, 2017
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