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  5. "Zapraszam cię do stołu."

"Zapraszam cię do stołu."

Translation:I am inviting you to the table.

March 1, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tgbarnett

"I invite you to the table" would be a nicer translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scott579933

Does anybody know if zaprosić/zapraszać is a perfective/imperfective pair? If, so I would guess that zapraszać is imperfective based on its use here in the present tense? I used to think that Google knew the answer to everything, until I started asking it questions about the polish language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

That is correct. Most online dictionaries like pons or wiktionary will tell you which one it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scott579933

Dzięki za pomoc!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnoldpitt

Whilst this a good literal translation, an English person would more likely say "Please come to the table"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

True, but not necessarily relevant. This sentence is to teach the use of the verb "to invite"/"zapraszać", not the more general "please do xyz"/"prosić".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

Polish "Chodź do stołu" would be more likely (more... everyday) Polish sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

You mean as a blunt imperative, without "proszę"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

I guess I wouldn't say "proszę" in an informal setting (it's informal after all and they should be happy there's food :D) and if it was formal... I'd go with "Zapraszam do stołu" (I wouldn't put the 'whom' part, it's obvious).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

I believe that "chodź" sounds less blunt than you might expect, since it refers to movement towards the speaker, like "come here!".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immerweiter

i would say sit down on the table, please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Hmmm. German first language speaker? "On the table" would be "Auf dem Tisch". Standard English for your version would be "Sit down at the table, please." That's a bit remote from the original Polish, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/immerweiter

your right, i'm german thanks for your answer, I had to laugh about my english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheCirosh

Paul, it's incorrect without "the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

Given that 'za' and 'prz' are both prefixes, does the word 'praszam' on its own mean anything?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jellei

"prze" :) No, it does not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philipp88107

Is possible to use "zapraszam cię" only? Would it have the same meaning as the German "ich lade dich ein"? In English it would be "I invite you/I'm inviting you" but as far as I no, this wouldn't make much sense for native English speakers. In Germany we also use it to say that we would pay their drinks or their meal. Like if you invite a girl for having a meal in a restaurant than you would also pay for the girls food and the drinks. Or if you would like to go in a bar with your friend. He does not have any money and wouldn't go to the bar with you and than you say "ich lade dich ein". Than you pay his drink. Hopefully you get what I'm trying to explain with "zapraszam cię only". :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alik1989

Good question... If the context is clear, you would most commonly hear just "zapraszam!" It has a very broad meaning, like just motivating someone to do something or to make use of something. At McDonalds, the employees will probably say "zapraszam(y)!" if it was your turn to move to the counter, but you didn't because you were distracted. In this example you can see that it absolutely doesn't mean "I'm paying". On the other hand, if a guy says "zapraszam cię do kina" ...depending on the cultural context, "I'm paying" would probably be implied.

In German, "ich lade dich ein" is kind of a combination of inviting someone and telling them that you will pay. I'm not sure if such a phrase even exists in Polish. If it's just about paying, then you would use the verb stawiać: Dzisiaj stawiam wszystkim piwo - Ich gebe heute allen ein Bier aus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philipp88107

Ahh. Thank you. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

You are right; just saying "I invite you" was a bit puzzling when a German friend first said it to me when we were having dinner together. I just thought he'd made an error in his otherwise excellent English. Now I'm used to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philipp88107

That's the interesting thing about learning another language. Knowing the words and knowing the meaning of what people saying are two different things. It's like in Poland people are "walking up a mountain" when things are getting worse and walking "down the mountain" when things are getting better. In Germany it's the other way around. (I believe in English you say something like "it's going upwards/downwards")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JerryMcCarthy99

Actually, that's a bit tricky. Take a look at https://www.phrases.org.uk/bulletin_board/20/messages/865.html to see what I mean :-)

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