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"My mother cooks for my father."

Translation:Mi madre cocina para mi padre.

5 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rdenning

How do you know when to use 'por' vs. 'para'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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https://www.duolingo.com/Fabian-bouw

So para is more about 'what for'? And por is more a 'why' or 'because'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScarletMel

Luis, this is a great resource. It answers a lot of questions I had. Thank you.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cbaker84

Man that is difficult lol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Be_Seven

Thank you for posting that link. Only now I feel like I'll never remember the difference between por and para. It's like they take every preposition in the world and use either por or para for them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AshleyBlackwood

Someone recently commented that generally if the action is coming toward the subject it is 'por' (by, near, around, for--like for dinner) but if the action is going away from the subject, it is 'para' (as in a gift). I also found a site http://masterofmemory.com/spanish which approaches language learning in a really cool way and may be helpful. I use both duo lingo and this site.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sloanbd
sloanbd
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"Mi mamá cocina para mi papá" means the recipient of my mothers cooking is my father, but I think "Mi mamá cocina por mi papá" should also be accepted because it means my mother cooks in place of or on behalf of my father. Both of those meanings are included in the semantic range of "My mother cooks for my father" in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregAngeli

This is true but I think the general understanding of the sentence in English is that my father is at the table.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sloanbd
sloanbd
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"General understanding" is the realm of cultural convention, not of grammar. Do you mean to say that since women generally cook for men in the culture, this should be the only acceptable answer? Both answers should be accepted because context not culture determines the meaning of "for" and we are not given the context to fix the meaning on our own. If we knew that the father was a cook who broke his hand and therefore his wife cooked for him, then we could fix the meaning of for as "por". If we knew the father was a deadbeat who couldn't cook for himself, then we could fix the meaning as "para". We don't know the context, therefore both meanings must be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stompariffic

Another scenario might be that the mother works as a cook in order to support the father. In that case I think she cooks for my father would also use por.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregAngeli

This is not like a test in school where we are trying to get an extra point for an incorrect answer. The point is to learn Spanish and the correct usage of por and para. I think the intent of the sentence is that my mother is in the kitchen cooking. Unless of course you used "por" intentionally to mean my mother cooks in place of my father.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sloanbd
sloanbd
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Campellomerrily, I live and work in Nicaragua. My experiences of Machista culture and my conversations (in Spanish) with others about their experiences have made me sensitive to this. And all that aside, discussing grammar is fun. Being picky is how some people learn. When I'm in conversations in Spanish with people on a daily basis, I don't want to interrupt them to ask them about grammar. It's a wonderful gift that we can have discussions about grammar here with other people who are knowledgeable and care about the subject. GregAngeli, I don't care about points, I just want people to recognize that through duolingo we don't know the intention or context of the sentence unless we're willing to accept sexism that assumes male and female roles as the context. None of us know how "for" is intentionally being used. I do agree that the more common usage would probably be para, but it don't think it costs duolingo anything to make the change to be more grammatically inclusive. There are better ways to teach the distinction between por and para, ways that can't even be misconstrued as sexism.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sloanbd
sloanbd
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Sounds like we agree on the use por and para then. I wasn't trying to argue for one or the other. I was trying to argue that depending on context either can be correct (and conversely, either can be incorrect given a different context). Not having that context, I think its an error to say that either is incorrect. This question was presented to me as multiple choice with both por and para as options and I selected them both as correct. I didn't have it as a sentence to translate where I'd have to pick only one of the two.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregAngeli

My point is that if you are arguing for por meaning "in place of" then that should have been your intent from the beginning and you were right. If you thought you were using por thinking that dad was the recipient then you were wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/campellomerrily

Absolutely agree GregAngeli So much time seems to be spent dissecting grammar here that the most important lesson is forgotten, and that is that learning another language should be about being able to communicate with other people. I regularly watch TV programmes in which Spanish people are speaking English, and they happily speak it warts (often many warts), and all, whilst English speakers learning Spanish seem to prefer arguing the nitty gritty with each other, and I wonder do they ever actually get into conversations with native Spanish speakers at all.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bkofman
Bkofman
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Aren't mamá and papá = mom and dad? In English, mom and dad are not always interchangeable with mother and father. What about mamá/papá vs. madre/padre?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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In Spanish they are more interchangeable than they are in English (native speaker).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bkofman
Bkofman
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Gracias!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smarnv
smarnvPlus
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Can I use "cocer" here as well? If not, then why is it not appropriate?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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"cocer" means more like "boil", so I'd say no.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lamwaggi

I put: ´mi madre cocina a mi padre´ why isn´t that correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luis
LuisPlus
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That means "My mother cooks my father"...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thewolfgirl7

That sounds so creepy...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnkitSpanish

I think what he wants to say is why can't it be "Mi madre cocina para a mi padre?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/e.brown
e.brown
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I'm still not clear on why we can't say "Mia madre"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sloanbd
sloanbd
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Mía means "mine" (feminine gender). Mi means "my".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennifer493398

mi mamá le cocina a mi papá is the same as mi madre cocina para mi padre in central and south american countries

2 years ago