"Она не хочет эту плохую машину."

Translation:She does not want this bad car.

March 2, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/acuencadev

Лада * winks *

March 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielBenning

I have a lada Niva, hands down it's the best vehicle I've ever owned, nothing has been as bulletproof and easy to work on.

December 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Haggra

Are you using it as an armored vehicle in battlefields? Why do you need it to be bulletproof?

March 15, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Ruslan_I

Жигули))

December 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/dedpan

Speaking of bad cars, is there an idiomatic equivalent of 'lemon'?

May 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/stanmann

Can you believe it? Our censorial overlords deemed an "automobile" not to be a car. I did apprise them of their error.

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DasMoose88

While I fully understand why you think this would work, "automobile" is a completely different word in Russian: "автомобиль."

Also, while a "car" can only be a "car", an "automobile", can be a "car", a "truck", or even a "golf-cart" (a golf-cart is pushing it); as an "automobile" is defined as: "any road vehicle, typically with four wheels; powered by an internal combustion or electric engine, and able to carry a small number of people."

July 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/stanmann

You are absolutely correct, my friend. Technically speaking, the word “automotive” actually means “self propelled,” and as such the term “automobile” could, in theory, encompass any vehicle driven by a self-contained power source (as opposed to an external power source, such as a horse-drawn carriage or similar conveyance). And so, the term “automobile” could include trains, streetcars, submarines, and even UFOs. However, in my many moons traversing this globe, this hoary flatus (a mildly dysphemistic expression meaning one-of-many-years) has never, ever seen the word “automobile”used to describe anything but vehicles designed to convey small numbers of passengers over the roadway. Thus, this proudly pedantic ass avers that in common English parlance the words “car” and “automobile” are, and ought to be, seen and treated as synonymous. End of rant. Thanks for the insight, Friend.

July 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Theron126

Yeah, I have to agree with all the above. "Automobile" to me, and probably to most people, means "car" - neither more nor less.

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DasMoose88

All rants here are necessary; especially with issues of Duolingo not accepting words which have become common-place to use; as such words are universally inter-changeable in English. (And while I pointed out that the words "car" and "automobile" are not the same in Russian, I too have a problem with the limited translations allowed when we are attempting to translate from Russian to English; where such a word should be perfectly acceptable as "equivalent" translation.) In fact, I put automobile as my initial response.

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion

I know that a car is usually called a машина, but is a машина always a car? Without context, couldn't she equally well be rejecting a sewing machine, or the latest item of machinery for her factory?
Or is the use to mean "car" so ubiquitous that reference to any other machine would require an explanatory adjective?

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci

Машина could be any machine, but without further context it’s usually understood as a car. If we knew for sure that this sentence is part of a story about a factory with some machinery involved, it would be well possible to translate машина as "machine." :) A sewing machine is usually швейная машинка.

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/daughterofAlbion

Oh-oh. Are there any rules as to when a machine is a машинка? Or is this just something to be learned on an item by item basis...

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gwenci

Well, if it’s small enough, it can be a машинка. :) -к- is here a diminutive suffix.

July 14, 2016
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