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  5. "Dych chi eisiau moron?"

"Dych chi eisiau moron?"

Translation:Do you want carrots?

March 2, 2016

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/in5yearstime

whats the singular of moron?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

Moronen. I did a really good comment on this type of plural, somewhere a while back, but I'll try and summarise. Some nouns (especially things that come in groups e.g plants, animals and children) are treated as plurals in their base forms e.g Moron(Carrots), Coed(Trees) and Plant(Children). These then are given suffixes to make them singular. So Moronen(Carrot), Coeden(Tree) and Plentyn(Child). Most of the time the "-en" words are feminine and the "-yn" words are masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinEdwar10

Could this also be 'do you want a carrot'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

No - see above. ‘A carrot’ - moronen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowanM.1

The Welsh word for carrots reminds me a little of the Romanian "morcov" (which I think is "carrot", singular). They must share a similar root (fitting since a carrot is a root vegetable - ahem). Maybe the German word Möhre also comes from that root. Is it perhaps Latin?

I did have to laugh a little at this sentence considering what the English word with the same spelling means. (You could probably make a pretty funny cross-lingual skit with it.) But I guess you could remember the Welsh word's meaning with a silly sentence like "Only a moron wouldn't eat carrots" or "Bugs Bunny thinks only a moron wouldn't like carrots". Something along those lines.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The Welsh word for carrots reminds me a little of the Romanian "morcov" (which I think is "carrot", singular). They must share a similar root (fitting since a carrot is a root vegetable - ahem). Maybe the German word Möhre also comes from that root. Is it perhaps Latin?

Quite possible that they do share a root, but it's further back than that.

Romanian morcov is a borrowing from Bulgarian morkov, which goes back to Proto-Slavic *mъrky and further to Proto-Indo-European *mrk-uH- -- which in turn is related to Old High German morha, from which modern German Möhre and Mohrrübe come from.

The Welsh moron, on the other hand, is said to come from a Middle English word moren meaning "roots". (Which reminds me of the word Wurzel in German -- literally "root" but in some regions also used for "carrot".)

It's possible that this Middle English word moren is related to the German Möhren -- but I don't know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowanM.1

Diolch for that very interesting information. Have a Lingot and thank you once again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaibhidhR

Yes, definitely it is related. We are all one big happy Indo-European family. See my post here for further details. Since you mention Wurzel (which is a variant of root, I was intrigued that the Swedish is morot which is simply moren and root stuck together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathleenAy4

I've been remembering by linking the shape of a carrot to a dunce hat. Thanks for the linguistic information and questions, and thanks to mizinamo for so much awesome information in response!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Calithilien

This confused me a bit so I was going to ask for cognates of "moron", but then I realised it's similar in German - Möhren :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George359055

Is the 'some' from the translation just implied in the original Welsh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Essentially, yes. Welsh doesn't have indefinite articles, e.g. "a" in the singular -- and "some" in English often acts like an indefinite article for the plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristenH1013

Moron has always carrot since I've started. Carrot, carrot soup, etc.

When did this appear after getting so far past this lesson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertGlass

What is your specific query? Is it carrot vs carrots? In English we would say that carrot soup is made out of carrots. Welsh evidently simplifies it and calls it carrots soup - so you have a problem with English here not Welsh

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