https://www.duolingo.com/Arnauti

Fössta tossdan i mass – first Thursday in March

Arnauti
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In the Swedish region Småland, today is a big day – it's the first Thursday in March, or in the local idiom "fössta tossdan i mass". Actually it's just a very inofficial tradition, but some people like to celebrate this day – simultaneously making fun of and celebrating their special local pronunciation which lacks the retroflex 'sh' sounds that would be heard in this expression as said by the majority of native speakers.

So I'd like to extend my congratulations to our TTS, the Text-to-speech, the Voice, our Astrid, whose (lack of) R sounds reveal an otherwise carefully disguised Småland origin.

Link to article about it in Dagens nyheter: http://www.dn.se/nyheter/sverige/smaland-firar-fossta-tossdan-i-mass/

2 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Crash course in småländska:

  • All nouns that end in -el switch to -le in the definite: cyklen rather than cykeln, biblen rather than bibeln, etc.
  • The most important word is tya, which is synonymous with orka. Nobody actually uses it but it was in Vilhelm Moberg's Emigrants series and everyone in Sweden can quote a few phrases from the screen adaptation.
  • Of course, as noted above, rs turns into ss. Some dialects also skip the r prior to virtually any consonant, but it's not the norm.
  • Words beginning with a consonant tj-sound, such as köra, käka, are pronounced like the "ch" in English "change". This is most common in the northeast.
  • The short i vowel frequently turns into an e instead. The further south you go, the more it turns into a diphthong. The long å is also frequently diphthonged as well.

There's a lot of regional variety, though, and none of the above is true for all dialects in Småland. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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The -el/-le thing is true of skånska as well, in my experience. I always found it quite endearing :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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That's interesting, it definitely doesn't exist in Malmö or Bromölla but Scania is large so I'm sure there are many places where you're right. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joel__W
Joel__W
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Almost everyone I've met from Skåne (mostly people who have moved to Gothenburg though) have this feature. Even a guy from Blekinge (!) does this. Maybe they were shunned by their peers for it, so they fled the county? ;)

Edit: It also appears this is a thing in Danish, so I imagine it is a pretty old areal feature shared between Denmark and southern Sweden. See https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cyklen.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Sure, that makes sense. :p

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sple00

Never heard of "Triangelen"? OK, there are different dialects within Malmö, but some seems to have it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Sure, but not Trianglen.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lundgren8
Lundgren8
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It’s common to leave out the e and just say Trianglen, cyklen, nycklen etc. That’s what I hear from most of my friends, I’ve only heard older speakers pronounce the full -elen.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lydiaoxenstierna

Tack! Men nu tyar jag inte (ch)öka efter spindlen i m(e)tt rum :(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Haha :) but chöka, did you mean "söka"? That doesn't make a tj-sound, so I'm afraid it's disqualified from the ch conversion. The closes thing is perhaps sköka, which makes an sj-sound, and which is an older word for prostitute.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lydiaoxenstierna

Oh whoops, I did mean söka :D Thanks for the correction, and I'm sure sköka will need to be used in my everyday life :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/devalanteriel
devalanteriel
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Haha, I'm not judging. :p

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sple00

You can learn more about this dialect here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyheLkAebPY (Swedish TV-show, so you have to bee good at Swedish, but I guess we all help you if you need.)

2 years ago
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