"Gaeth e siocled."

Translation:He had chocolate.

March 6, 2016

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuengerJT

Common colloquial usage in many parts of Wales. The supposed 'north vs south' difference is a red herring - there are many dialects and Duo can only cover a few common variants of a few common words.

February 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamRossTyler

It is my understanding that this is simply a more lazy way of saying "Fe/Me gaeth e siocled". It could also be written "Cafodd e siocled" or "Caeth e siocled". Cafodd (or caeth) is from the verb cael which means to have. I find that the current desire to teach sloppy Welsh can be confusing as the logic is often missing.

July 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

This is not 'sloppy Welsh'!

Unlike English, but like some other languages, Welsh has a number of registers - levels of formality, perhaps. These range from slang to literary and Biblical Welsh. This course, along with the nationally sponsored Welsh for Adults courses at introductory levels, aims at a middle of the road, day-to-day Welsh which can be used and understood all over Wales. It avoids most dialect forms except for those very widely heard across Wales in the media, and it avoids both slang and the formal forms found in more formal and literary registers.

The mi/fe positive marker is frequently dropped in colloquial Welsh even though the mutation which follows is sometimes kept. This is particularly found with conjugated forms of cael and gwneud.

The conjugated forms of cael and gwneud have many variants, and most introductory Welsh courses teach the most widely used forms to begin with. Other forms are taught on more advanced courses or can be found in particular areas of the country.

July 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EinarSig

Is this the north or south variant?

March 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Common colloquial usage in many parts of Wales.

The supposed 'north vs south' difference is a red herring - there are many dialects and Duo can only cover a few common variants of a few common words.

March 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuengerJT

Is this the north or south variant?

February 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

It is not a dialect variant... It is simply a way of expressing the simple past using a form of cael. As stated in the earlier answer, this pattern is used all over Wales.

February 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daschaich

Oh, it's a form of gwneud... The GPC kicked me to caeth when I tried to look it up, and similarly Google Translate told me about chocolate addiction.

Hang on... More Googling suggests this is a form of cael rather than gwneud, yes? (Edited to fix the link.)

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcode
Mod
  • 1653

Yes, it's a form of cael.

This is also often 'Cafodd e/o' and also 'Caeth e' in regional dialects.

Cafodd and Caeth are more correct in terms of the grammar of this construction but 'Gaeth' as the statement (and question) is the form that has been adopted for the standard Welsh for adults courses as it is the most common form used in spoken Welsh.

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yuengerJT

oh

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stephen985782

He had chocolate.

June 8, 2017
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