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https://www.duolingo.com/sonofneptune

Nordic Languages

sonofneptune
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Jeg vil to learn danish, norwegian and swedish but am I able to confuse myself? because these langauges look like same

2 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CosmoKaiza
CosmoKaiza
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Yes they are very similar. I would advice you to learn one of them and master it then learn the two others. Norwegian would be the best choice because it is considered as the bridge between Danish and Swedish

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sonofneptune
sonofneptune
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thank you so much

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brittalexiswm

At the very least, don't learn Danish and Norwegian at the same time. They are so hard to distinguish if you get confused easily.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindrhound
lindrhound
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Learn one of them well enough and you won't have much trouble understanding the written versions of the other languages at least.

Speaking as a native Norwegian, there's not much point for me to learn how to write proper Swedish or Danish unless I need it for school or work.

Listening and speaking is what might be difficult. A Norwegian person might not always understand spoken Danish, a Swedish person might not always understand spoken Norwegian or Danish and I've even met Danish people that don't understand that much of spoken Norwegian. Most people get each other eventually though.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sonofneptune
sonofneptune
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Yes it does not mean that you will be able to understand although they are similiar. I am a native Turkish speaker but I understand azerbaijan in a difficult way. Both of Azerbaijan and Turkish look like danish and norwegian or swedish. Of course there will be differences between all the languages. That is what makes culture. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindrhound
lindrhound
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Right, exactly. There are differences, and sometimes a word or two that you might need to change, and sometimes you don't understand everything, but all in all, if you know one of them, you'll understand the others.

Edit: Just be consistent, don't replace one language's spelling with another's and things like that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindrhound
lindrhound
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Edit 2. : I think I just managed to confuse myself. Sorry about that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baris-Kopist

Hi, I'm from Turkey but I've lived in Denmark my whole life. The danish grammar is very hard and the words does not sound like, how they are written. So i will recommend Norwegian or Swedish to learn first. I've also heard from many people that Norwegian and Swedish are much easier to learn than Danish.

Good luck.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sonofneptune
sonofneptune
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Merhaba Barış! I have a friend who says the same thing like you that danish is not read as written :) Thank you so much for the advice

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStanton
PeterStanton
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I worked on Swedish for a while last year and now I'm working on Danish, and I've found it a very pleasant experience. The vocabulary is all very similar so Danish is a breeze now, but the languages are pronounced differently enough that it's easy to keep them apart in my head.

2 years ago