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"Ĉu birdoj demetas ovojn?"

Translation:Do birds lay eggs?

2 years ago

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Tato_Huenupi
Tato_Huenupi
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Jes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sspadaro81
sspadaro81
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Is "demetas" used for anything else besides laying eggs?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/j.kam
j.kam
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Yes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AANickFan

"Ovo" grossly reminds me of "ovaries", where the eggs come from. Thanks, Esperanto!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davi_Viana

"ovo" is also egg in others languages, like portuguese

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cola1counted
cola1counted
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Also, in English, when you're a vegetarian that eats eggs, you're called an ovo vegetarian (or lacto-ovo, if you also consume dairy products)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tigonus

This is interesting. Google translates "demeti" as "take off," on its own. However, when I try the sentence "Birdoj demetas ovojn," it translates as, "Birds lay eggs." Does the verb DEMENTI have something to do with divesting oneself of something? I would be interested hearing about this. Much thanx.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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meti is "put", and demeti is literally something like "put off" or "put away".

In English, we "put on" a hat but then "take off" the hat, but in Esperanto (or German), it's "put" both times: "put on, put off".

And laying eggs is - or can be - expressed as "putting them away (from one's body)".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SariahLily
SariahLily
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Thanks!

How I'm going to remember this now:

meti = put

demeti = unput :D

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rava-ananaso
rava-ananaso
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Are birds laying eggs? was marked wrong and I realise why, but it could be correct in a very specific context. xD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tigonus

Actually, by my understanding, that could be a perfectly good answer. Is this something that just comes from contextual meaning?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakharrVin

Yes, as long as they're not male birds.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Vitruvius1
Vitruvius1
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What's the difference between "demeti" and "meti"?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/justmegan99

I said "can birds lay eggs" and it came up as a wrong answer. Is that not also correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LegionOfTom

I think 'can they' is asking whether they are able to, whereas 'do they' is asking whether they actually do that thing you're asking about. For example I 'can' play the guitar but I don't 'do' it any more. That's how I interpret it, anyway.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyisland21

Can is a different word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Imthebestlearner

Yes Jes Ja

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamScott794079
AdamScott794079
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Jes

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hugglesaim
hugglesaim
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Hrmmmmm... Let me think...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DominicSal294966

I put "Do the birds lay eggs?" and it marked it wrong. Isnt that the same thing?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AANickFan

No, it's not the same thing.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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No, they are not the same thing.

"The birds" is definite; it includes the definite article "the". It refers to a specific group of birds: one that you have been talking about before, or that is somehow obvious to the listener.

"Birds" is indefinite. It refers to birds in general.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LFenske
LFenskePlus
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There's no "the" (la). Adding "the" changes the meaning.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QueenOfKitKats

Ne, nur dinosaûroj demetas ovojn (idk if I said that right xD) (this is a joke)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Varad211396

Jes, Duo.

4 months ago