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"Je peux vous offrir un verre ?"

Translation:Can I buy you a drink?

January 1, 2014

251 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clearblueseas

Could you also translate this as "Can I offer you a glass?" I know that this lesson is flirting so from context "Can I offer/buy you a drink" are more standard. But if you were hosting a friendly gathering or something you might open a bottle of wine and ask "Can I offer you a glass (of this)?" I was just wondering whether this would also be how you would say that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DougBruce1

Seems the automatic translation to me. After all, context is everything. And what if you were in a situation where someone said, "J'ai une bouteille du vin, mais rien à boire avec.", or something similar that is more grammatically correct. Likewise, if you arrive at a party and everyone is drinking wine, "Can I offer you a glass?" seems like an obvious thing for the host - or, for that matter, anyone else near the drinks table - to suggest.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeValley1

I agree that there are many variations, all of which sound a bit flirty. "Can I offer you a glass?" is way more flirty than "Can I buy you a drink?" It implies that the person might already have ordered a fabulous wine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Preston3103

Really?! In my opinion it's the other way around. "Can I buy you drink?" Is the go-to expression I've heard in most all movies with a flirty bar scene. Same for lyrics in songs. Not "Can I offer you a glass?". Not sure where you've heard a guy say.."I'm going to offer that woman a glass"... to his friends. It sounds formal and impersonal. Not flirty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Different place, at home with a bottle of wine in hand, it would not seem formal and impersonal. The other location was at a restaurant with a bottle of wine on the table, but what everyone needs to understand is that even at a bar in French they will not use the word “buy” they will only offer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/senor_limpio

In his chart-topping song titled Offer You a Glass, T Pain says: "Imma offer you a glass / [autotune 'oohs'] / Then imma take you home with me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathildabee

I put that and got it wrong. Second time around I obeyed and put "drink." I also put "offer" and it gave an alternative of "buy." I would think there would be a distinction, not an alternative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HardScrabbl

Shouldn't the literal translation be "i want you to offer a drink"? Is there a better translation for the desired query?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

No, since « offrir » is an infinitive, and there is no conjunction to lead into the next clause (like « que »), then this sentence is a single clause, with « offrir » having the same subject as « peux » -- "I", or « je ». To say "I want you to offer a drink" (you're confusing peux with veux, but whatever), say « Je veux que vous offriez un verre. »


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Altina87

Je très désolée,.... but can you dumb that down for those of us in the back? I don't understand, I also read it to literally be "I can you offer a drink" it's going to be hard for me to retain that if I can't make sense of it #HMP


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lulularosa

Je peux - I can

vous - to you (here "vous" is the indirect pronoun, something is being given or done to/for/about/ 'you' - you would recognize it if we were using the familiar 'you' because it would be "te" [actually t'offrir, in this case] instead of "vous")

offrir une verre - offer a drink

I can to you offer a drink - in English - I can offer you a drink

add the question mark - Can I offer you a drink?

Hope that helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Je suis trés désolée...but you are going to have to learn that in French the object pronouns come before the verb, while in English the object pronouns come after the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Keep in mind that the direct or, in this case, indirect object pronoun comes before the verb in French and that the sentence form “I want you to...” is strictly found in English to avoid using the Subjunctive mood in a clause: “I want that you offer a drink.”. In French they would use the subjunctive mood in a clause for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nyharel

Moreover, if you're offering someone a drink in something other than a class - perhaps a bottle, can, or plastic cup - you wouldn't say "verre", would you? Verre is literally a glass, not any drink container, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikki709816

True, i thought drink was boisson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Drink is boisson, but une boisson is any consumable liquid. As many have explained in these comments, this sentence (with « un verre ») would be used in a place like a bar or nightclub, where they serve alcoholic drinks in glasses. It is implied that you are offering a drink of alcohol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aish97632

puis-je t'offrir un verre


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That should also be a correct alternative with the first letter capitalized and ending with a question mark. https://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/Puis-je+t%e2%80%99offrir+un+verre


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stephanm87

18-8-2016, still not accepted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gnasheroos

No, you cannot buy me a drink


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QuintonStevens

Can I offer you a glass should be accepted because I have asked a lady that. It might be colloquial but it exists.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dollybroked

I answered with this and it wasn't accepted :( 21/06/15


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pstbukkie

Same on Mon, 22 Feb 2016, Not accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellenkeyne

Still not on 11 June 2018.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aimeeshimi

Answered jan 26 and not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charemma262

august 31 is still not accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graminthesalmon

Glass should be a substitute for drink. I lost a heart for using the literal translation which is actually used in flirting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ERGCmcnabb6

that would be nice. while we're talking let me offer you some free advice

<h1>hamilton</h1>

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Athelari

Parlez moins, souriez plus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoonilWazlib26

Ne les informez pas que vous êtes contre ou êtes d'accord.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maya7939

Tu ne peux pas être sérieux?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethal159659

Talk less WOT Smile more HA Don't let them know what you're against or what you're for


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strange_Things

ShAke hAnds wItH iL cHarM eLle


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmsyN

Hamilton fans <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/softhearted

WAS JUST THINKING THAT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PracticalOne

@softhearted same here!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christina185844

I was looking for this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YulieSF

Are there any flirting sentences for girls as well? You know we can flirt now..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoiraSheph

Its 2017, you can be a girl and buy someone a drink. It's not the 50s anymore, geez.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ERGCmcnabb6

Yes, most of these are directed towards males >: (


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VulcanBlurryface

I totally agree...girls are allowed to flirt!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WendlaGoodman

That would be nice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaGiCaLtRaShBag

While im (i forgot) lemme offer you some free advice: Talk. Less.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commie--

Smile more~ Dont let them know what your against or what your for


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nakamura250216

Click boom then it happened


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imporeo1

why is the word drink in this case verre where as when you first come across the word it is bois or a variant there of


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

You mean "boisson". But that word is used more for a beverage. In this context, asking to buy someone an alcoholic drink, you would use "verre".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berriegirl12345

No, you can't buy me a drink. Let me tell you what I think: I think you could use a mint.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redseadragon

Great response. I will use it on dumb men who try to text me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lilush0_0

How do you say 'may'? I believe anyone 'can' buy others a drink, but with flirting I would wqnt to ask the right question: 'May I buy you a drink?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KamayaSinclair

Puis-je= can I? Or may I?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes, they don't have another alternative specific for "may". https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-french/may

I tried "May I offer you a drink?" and it was accepted as correct. "buy" is an acceptable alternative in English, but keep in mind that in French, buying for someone is not mentioned.

In French the use of "vous" makes it polite .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ctomas

'Can I offer you a glass?' was what I tried as was marked wrong for. Is there something wrong with that translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Duolingo wants to make sure that you understand that if you want to ask "Can I buy you a drink?" a very common expression in English that you would have to use the common French version "Je peux vous offrir un verre?" An alcoholic drink translates to "un verre" in French, so the French expression does not literally mean a glass.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MJ276

"Verre" literally translates to "glass", thereby the sentence could be "can I offer you a glass?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

This is the section in which one common expression is translated to the common expression in the other language though. "un verre" does not mean "a glass" in the context of this sentence, it means "an alcoholic drink".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaGiCaLtRaShBag

Chill, Lafayette, thats Burr's line


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarquisdeL20

Don't tell me what to do


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnikaChauhan

Fools who run their mouths off wind up dead...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyMouse03

That would be nice. While we're talking, let me offer you some free advice. Talk less. Smile more....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethal159659

..Don't let them know what you're against or what you're for. You can't be serious? You wanna get ahead? Yes. Fools who run their mouths off wind up dead


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abegail.adt

Can someone please send me a link on how to construct french sentences? :)) its a bit confusing 'cause s-tv-do can't be used properly :)) do they have like a pattern or something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulDeNice1

Can I buy you a drink - is not the only correct answer to this question. The direct translation is "Can I offer you a glass?"!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

This is a section specifically for translation of a common expression in one language to a common expression in the other language. In the context of this sentence "un verre" means "an alcoholic drink."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hedleyhedley

It should be either 'glass' or 'drink'. 'Can I offer you a glass' cannot be seen as a mistranslation, for what is a struggling host or hostess seeing someone by the drinks table without a glass going to say?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/canarul

If you wanted to say "Do you want to buy me a drink," would you said "Voulez-vous me payer un verre," or would "offrir" also work for the verb there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Offrir is the only verb that sounds right to me in that case, because « Voulez-vous me payer un verre ? » means "Do you want to pay me a drink", meaning "give me payment in the form of a drink", which doesn't sound right at all and is far removed from the intended meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

In French, they do avoid talking about buying or paying for something for someone. It is considered rude. They will always offer you something and it is basically not your business how they will get it for you. I wonder how they feel about going Dutch? I guess you would have to specify that you would enjoy the other person's company, even though you are refusing their offer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaques_Chen

Oui, s'il vous plaît, :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mujer70

I keep getting mostly correct answers, but this lesson just seems to go on and on for no reason. Does anyone else feel this way or is it just me. Is there a logical reason why this lesson is so much longer than all the others I've completed. I did complete it once, but it lit up again and I have not been able to finish it since. Feeling discouraged. Are their any suggestions please, or is it just what it is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfaman1

This exercise is faulty. I have completed it three times and the progress bars have not moved. Yes, I am a slow learner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mujer70

I started all over again from first lesson as though I were just beginning and it worked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tristan2023

I wrote do you want a drink instead of Can I buy you a drink and it said I was wrong. PLS help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Totally different sentence... "Do you want a drink?" = (in the same tone as the given sentence) « Vous voulez un verre ? ». Or, you can phrase it « Est-ce que vous voulez un verre ? », or most formally, « Voulez-vous un verre ? »


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YssieMelen

I'ma buy you a drank.... Ooooooeeeeeh, Then I'ma take you home with me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethal159659

I love all the hamiltrash here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mariuseleven

"Je peux vous offrir un verre?" Why, of course! I'd like a strong black tea with a drip of milk and one pack of sweetener, and with mountain of whipped cream on top. And if you say 'No,' this was never true love.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Unfortunately "un verre" in the context of this question means "an alcoholic drink". If they offered you "une boisson", then it could be any drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Thank you for catching that, so I fixed it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elsie527

That is "difficle"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abe1029

Why is 'verre' masculine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

There is no rhyme or reason. It is an exception along with “homme” to the rule that most words ending in e are feminine. https://www.thoughtco.com/french-gender-masculine-endings-1368853


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pRoSesIng

May i......offer you....a d-drink....of........of..of.......JUICE AND NOT WINE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidJeffe8

Why is there a flirting section on Doulingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mayo996

Can someone tell me why vous is before offrir and not after?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

Yes, in French, the direct and indirect object pronouns always come before the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laura844799

That would be nice/while we're talking let me give you some free advice/talk less/what?/smile more/oh/don't let them know what you're against and whay you're for


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Peggy_Carter-

"Fools who run their mouths off wind up dead" right after Burr says that, Laurens walks in and starts talking (well, singing, but same difference). Laurens is also the first person to die in the show. Also, there are 19 songs from Dear Theodosia ( the first mention of Philip) to Stay Alive (Reprise) , Philip's death. Philip lives to be 19. Similarly, if you count Laurens Interlude, there are 47 songs in Hamilton. Alex dies at 47. Coincidence? I think not. Where does Lin come up with this stuff?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kangankhanke

Why is vous before offrir?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

objects go before the verb that they are related to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hamilton_fan123

Hamilton: That would be nice Burr: While we're talking let me offer you some free advice- ~from the musical Hamilton~


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaldockJa

Why is "vous" before "offrir"? Word per word this translates to "I can you buy a drink?" in English, not "I can buy you a drink?"; it's jumbled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

That is not correct word order for English, but it is the required word order for French. The direct object snd the indirect object must go directly before the verb that they would go after in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaBaerwald

Is "peux-je vous offrir un verre" acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mimawbaubo

Je peux is. Or puis-je. But not peux-je or Je puis. I just read this in a discussion on another question.

Je puis is an archaic/formal expression, which is not really used anymore by anyone. However, when posing a question, one can say "Puis-je" which approximately translates to "May I"

Je peux is the more common usage "I can" but you could say "Je peux vous offrir un verre" and it would still translate to “Can I buy you a drink?"

HTH and that I explained properly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ag3n7_z3r0

I've also heard it is used because of euphony, since peux-je just doesn't sound all that great.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catleal

I also learned the could would be more polite whereas can implies more of an order. I've put 'could I' and was not accepted. Is it really wrong or should duolingo accept it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NRLIz5

Why this sentence construction in French? I would have guessed that "Je peux...?" as a question would be incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2346

It is a common way that French ask questions, by giving a declarative sentence and using an inflection of the voice at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/primevaltho

I put "I can offer you a drink". And got it wrong,but on another question it said " Tu es manniquin?" and i put "You are a model"and i got it right. Please help me understand my mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parsamana

That's a good question, I also wonder what the distinction here is between the two. Certainly the French version here is relying on intonation to ask the question (as opposed to verb-subject inversion or adding est-ce que). It is normal that you wanted to do the same. But unfortunately I don't have an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

I would report it. Usually, there would be a filler word or two in English, for example: "So, I can offer you a drink, then?" But this non-inverted form with the subject first is supposed to indicate surprise or asking for affirmation, so "I can offer you a drink?" seems like a suitable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabnSaa

You travel in different circles. Filler words are by no means the rule. "I can offer you a drink" in response to a previous conversation is different from the context of "Can I offer yo a drink?" The second one implies that it could be the beginning of a conversation. Your example would necessitate that conversation was already taking place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

You're just proving my point. The formal way to ask this question in French, especially to start a conversation, is « Puis-je vous offrir un verre ? », which is "Can/May I offer you a drink?" in English. The informal way to phrase it, especially if you're responding to or following up on a previous conversation, is « Je peux vous offrir un verre ? », which is "I can offer you a drink?" in English. That's why there would usually be a filler word or some signal with your body to refer back to what was said before, because one would only ask "I can offer you a drink?" out of surprise, or to affirm something assumed or said before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabnSaa

You're stretching...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

How so? You do remember that this started with someone wondering why "I can offer you a drink?" is marked wrong, I hope? Who cares about filler words at this point -- those come with different personalities, communication styles, moods, and so on. "I can offer you a drink?" is one way to translate this, even though it sounds strange on its own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabnSaa

Are you a native English speaker? I'm 70+ years old, well-traveled, and I have never heard this sentence used as a question, except in the unlikely scenario that I posited above. Not that it couldn't happen, but the likelihood of a native English speaker using it in that manner is pretty slim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Yes, I'm a native English speaker from Texas. As I said before, I would only use it with a filler word like "then" or "right", as in "I can buy you a drink, right?" The most that person can do is report it if they feel their answer should be accepted. If the moderators think it's too far off from an accurate translation, then it won't be. No use arguing about it anymore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidOldacre

DUOLINGO rejected "je peux t’offrir un verre" Why? It has offered that as a solution when used the other way around (on April 29th 2015)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

I believe that would only be marked incorrect if you're given a multiple-choice exercise and you don't select both right answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidOldacre

You accepted "je peux t’offrir un verre" on April 29th 2015. Why is this now rejected?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orange.Sky

Would it not sound better to say "puis-je" instead of "je peux"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

It's the "most formal" way to ask this question, but you can phrase it in one of three ways: 1) « Puis-je vous offrir un verre ?; 2) Est-ce que je peux vous offrir un verre ?; 3) Je peux vous offrir un verre ? »


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElAmotro

Is there any difference between Verre and Boisson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilyMouse03

Boisson is beverage in general, while verre refers to an alcoholic drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dan.bondarenko

I am wondering the same!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philippawi5

they should let us do straight translations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

literal translations would change the meaning of the original question. "un verre" in the context of this question means "an alcoholic drink".


[deactivated user]

    I thought acheter was to buy?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    It is, and offrir means "to offer", but in the context of offering to buy someone a drink, you can translate offrir as "buy" if you want.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sohaila10

    I said this right (three times!)but it wasn' t accepted! Also, the person who tells you how to say it went way too fast!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheila386395

    This flirting app will not close for some reason.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabnSaa

    What is with the flirting bit? No matter how many times I go through it, it stays the same.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpiralStat

    I see where this is going...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilvaAnajulia

    I put " Can i go get you a drink?" And got REJECTED!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    Well that would be wrong here. Are you confusing it with "Voulez-vous aller prendre un verre?" which is "Do you want to go get a drink?" (with me, is implied) which we had earlier? "Est-ce que je peux aller vous prendre un verre?" could work for your version.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leucetios

    "can i offer you a beverage" is not accepted...

    mother flippin cow excrement IMHO


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    "A beverage" is une boisson and is too general for this exercise. The point of asking someone if you can offer them a drink (in this context) is to buy alcohol for them. Un verre (literally, a glass) is specifically referring to an alcoholic drink.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leucetios

    oh. well i look stupid now haha. cheers mate


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter603099

    What about "voulez vous boire qualque chose avec moi"? Is it the same context?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    « Voulez-vous boire quelque chose avec moi ? » (inversions must be hyphenated). Of course, it's not a translation of this given sentence, if that's what you're asking, but I don't see why it couldn't also be used in a similar context (I'm picturing a bar or nightclub). Although I'm not sure how Francophones would perceive it, using boire quelque chose sounds a little awkward. I'd be more likely to ask « Voulez-vous prendre un verre avec moi ? » ("Do you want to have a drink with me?"), since prendre is used like "have" in English with food and drink.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bana369526

    Yes , u certainly do


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dawndawn772

    The placement is so confusing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahBritson

    Is "verre" generally used when referring to an alcoholic drink, or a drink in a bar? Or would "boisson" work too?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    Both are fine. In general, « une boisson » is a drink of anything, while « un verre » is a glass, but since most alcoholic drinks in bars are served in glasses, then either would work.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    I do understand how it works, but it is funny to me, because I rarely drink alcohol, but I always use a glass. I won't use paper or plastic cups if I can help it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brayisbae

    Would it still make sense if you said "Peux je offrir vous" or would that be like someone saying in English "I can you buy"? Hopefully someone understands what I'm asking...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    It doesn't make sense for this conjugation of the verb, for euphony's sake they use « Puis-je vous offrir un verre ? » That's right « Je peux... » becomes « Puis-je... ? » and « vous » comes before « offrir ».


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvelynOlson0

    Boxing day, 2016 'Can I buy you a glass' STILL not accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    This is a section in which a common expression in one language is translated into a common expression in another language. "un verre" in the context of this question means "an alcoholic drink".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KylianFR

    I got this correct but I am confused about one thing. Why does this sentence say 'je peux' to ask a question but in other sentences 'voulez vous' is used? Would be happy if someone could explain me this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    Sure, it's one of the three ways to ask a question in French. Using this exercise as an example:

    1. « Puis-je vous offrir un verre ? » This is the formal way, using a technique called "(subject-verb) inversion". Like « Voulez-vous un verre ? » (Do you want a drink?), the inverted words are joined by a hyphen.

    2. « Est-ce que je peux vous offrir un verre ? » This is the conversational way.

    3. « Je peux vous offrir un verre ? » This is the informal way, sometimes used to seek affirmation. It's structured just like a statement, but with rising intonation at the end to signal a question.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KylianFR

    Ok merci bien. It is clear now, it just may be difficult to remember. But I guess this just takes time and real experience instead of duolingo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annalh.29

    How come this means drink when the word drink isnt in it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    Because of context. You would most likely ask this at a bar or nightclub, in which case you are implying a glass (un verre) of alcohol, or a drink.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StHendryan

    This section is horrible, no one question i could answer, everything are wrong LOL


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justina614

    Is there a reason why it didn't accept "Je peux t'offrir un verre?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    Were you given a multiple-choice question, and did you select BOTH correct answers?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justina614

    It gave me "Can I buy you a drink?" and asked me to type the French. I checked about 5 times to make sure I wasn't mistaken on anything else but they only difference between my answer and the bots answer was "t'offrir" and "vous offrir"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    Report it as correct then, although when I am asking politely I may not presume to use "tu" form with someone that I am just now getting to know, unless of course the person has already asked me to be informal. I think this is an opening line though. Although young people tend to use "tu" form with people of their own age.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TierneyRea

    That would be nice


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily930812

    I would like to see the correct english used. May i buy you a drink?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    "May I offer you a drink?" has been accepted as correct. "I" is always capitalized.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Damaris_R

    this dosnt really seem like flirting. you could ask you mum this like a real question if you had money. make one part hear where you get to know ppl


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teymanimi

    why je peux and not peux-je? why there is no inversion? seems that puis-je has a bit different meaning


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    You can definitely use an inversion here, but « peux-je » isn't possible and must be « puis-je » instead (it doesn't have a different meaning). There are three ways to form this question:

    1) Puis-je vous offrir un verre ? (formal) 2) Est-ce que je peux vous offrir un verre ? (conversational) 3) Je peux vous offrir un verre ? (informal, usually to seek confirmation)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeJeal

    Can I get you a drink was accepted, and this seems to me a more normal way of putting the question. I would add that "May I..." is the correct English form. I remember teachers many years ago in response to a question "Can I...?" responding "You can and you may!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    "May I...." is also accepted as correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ggwenllian

    "THAT WOULD BE NICE" "WHILE WE'RE TALKING LET ME OFFER YOU SOME FREE ADVICE -"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaGiCaLtRaShBag

    SHUT. UP. ...what? BE HAPPY MORE DONT LET THEM KNOW WHAT YOURE AGAINST OR WHAT YOURE FOR


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin968039

    That was a bit intense. Know something I don't?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraceLaw

    I can buy you a drink should also be acceptable because it could be asked with an inflection making it a question


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    Although this is expecting a yes answer, while the French question is still neutral.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OneBlueBoi

    Woah, Duo. I'm 12.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sir_music

    Is there a version that is more correct, or is this correct French grammar? Should it not be "May I buy you a drink?" ... am I missing the point?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    "May I ...." is also accepted as correct, but no, French does not have a way to specify "may". This is the only correct verb for that. You could use inversion "Puis-je vous offrir un verre?" to add a bit more formality if you wish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandboxribbon90

    That would be nice.

    WHILE WE ARE TALKING LET ME OFFER YOU SOME FREE ADVICE.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elsie527

    I'm French actually


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/123grace17

    so do they like drink alot in France?? or r crazy?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/123grace17

    AGAIN W/ THE DRINKING!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrenchByte

    OK, finally something more natural in the Flirting section.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acc354169

    Here is a cheat,the words with a capital letter in the front, is most likely to start the beginning of the sentence


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peniel173

    Isn't 'un boisson' a drink?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

    C'est féminin : une boisson. But that just means 'drink' as in any consumable liquid, not just alcohol. This sentence is in the flirting section, which means if you're offering to buy someone a "glass" (un verre), an alcoholic drink is implied.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/a_nwesha

    Why the "vous" has the s sound with offrir and not generally as in vous-venez


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    Yes, there is a liaison with a following word that starts with a vowel. https://www.duolingo.com/comment/2004908/French-liaisons-between-words


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dacontron

    That would be nice and wile we're at it let me pfer you dome free advice


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Duo10

    Talk about a mouth full of marbles, this is a tough one to say.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erickdelasnubes

    Is it the same to write "je peux... ?" Or "peux-je... ?"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

    Yes, there are many ways to ask questions in French. The standard way is “Est-ce que je peux...?” https://www.thoughtco.com/questions-in-french-1368935


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stev0nnie

    THAT WOULD BE NICE. AND WHILE WE'RE TALKING LET ME OFFER YOU SOME FREE ADVICE


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8LAU8

    I don't know, can you?


    [deactivated user]

      Can I buy a drink FOR you? 'buy you' implies that you are literally buying the person.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

      No, as long as there are both an indirect and a direct object “Can I buy you a drink?” is understood to mean “Can I buy a drink for you?”, but if you were to say “Can I buy you?” that would totally be about buying the person, because a direct object is required by that verb.

      Now with a different verb, you can even put just an indirect object with no confusion. “I write her a letter every day.” means that “I write a letter to her every day.” You can actually have a complete sentence with “I write her every day.” Now we don’t know if it is a letter or a postcard, but we know something is written to her every day. This works, because we don’t write people. I suppose, you could write on someone, but you would still be writing at least a word or a symbol.

      Now if you had two objects that both could be possible receivers or indirect objects with a verb such as “give”, then the word order of the sentence would be important. The first object would be the indirect object. “We gave the child to her.” = “We gave her the child.” If you were using two pronouns, then I would also prefer the version with the preposition.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/namjoonisoppa

      I would use this but im not 21 so


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

      You don’t have to be 21 in France though.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rosecoloredgayy

      that would be nice, while we're talking let me offer you some free advice--


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FerBound

      This is cute haha! I love this French flirting skill!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hans580384

      It's a bit strange to translate offrir with the English 'buy', when 'can I offer' (offrir) is perfect English and doesn't confuse people in thinking that offrir translates as 'buy'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valcrox

      Feminists are triggered by this


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillyF6

      6898 bottles of drink


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanOchoa599342

      Can i offer you a drink?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

      That should also be correct if you capitalize the pronoun “I”.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

      I tried to put these words in the correct order (as given above), but eg. 'I' was being placed into the last position, even though I was trying to put it in second position. Some sort of glitch.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

      It worked that time!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalaxyKitty99

      I don't know Duo, CAN YOU? It was a joke, put that knife down, don't be mD


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gae_Username

      cAn I bUy YoU a DrInK?? tHaT wOuLd Be NiCe!

      Not sorry


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jayton785436

      I get so confused because of the way it written and don't understand why it's wrong can someone please help


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

      We cannot see your answer from here. Please copy it to here so we can help you.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sailee16

      Um..... A phone is going to give me a drink I will say "don't spill it on yourself!"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sailee16

      I would say "heck no!"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordanWill561818

      When talking about drinks or drinking I thought it was boire.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irrelevant813910

      It would be great in this had a slow version of the audio for these. It's very hard to follow allow trying speaking these out loud. A slower options, would help practicing pronunciation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabiValeMedina

      But "buy" is "acheter"... It's "offrir" too?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steven98602

      I put 'I can buy you a drink?' marked wrong, doesn't seem wrong to me


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

      Though someone might say, "Can I offer you a drink?", meaning that they will buy one for you, to offer and to buy are really different things. You can offer someone something without having to buy it for them. Also, what you wrote is not proper English. You would say, "Can I buy you a drink?"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emily378626

      I don't know when Duo wants me to translate word for word literally or not!!! "verre" is technically "glass" and is marked wrong.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

      It's all part of the learning and challenge to learn when it's translated more literally and when not. This is what they commonly say, and French people know it means a drink, even if it literally translates as a glass. It's implied that it's got a drink in it! :-) There are similar things in most (if not all) languages.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SubPsycho43262

      Can anyone translate "I love you, please don't reject me


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

      "I love you" would be "Je t'aime." I wouldn't add the rest as it seems a bit desperate and rarely has the desired outcome.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

      Je t'aime, s'il te plait ne me rejette pas.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasmineS.4God

      Can "comprar" be used for "to buy"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ellenkeyne

      Are you mixing up your languages? "Comprar" is Spanish and this is a French question :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.IvPiJ6

      Why cant it be can i give you a drink


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ms_World

      Because 'offrir' means 'offer' and 'donner' means 'give'. (Plus people normally 'offer' a drink. The only time I can imagine using 'give' would be if someone was very sick and needed help to drink.)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaisaBinte2

      Can someone please break down the pronunciation of this sentence to me? :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

      "Je peux vous offrir un verre?"

      The J is pronounced like the s in "pleasure" The x in "peux" is not pronounced. The s in "vous" which is not pronounced usually is forming a liason with the following word because it starts with a vowel sound and it becomes a z to start that next word.

      The n in "un" is not pronounced, but it makes the u a nasal sound.

      See the following pronunciation guide: https://www.thoughtco.com/beginning-french-pronunciation-1369548

      https://www.thoughtco.com/learn-proper-french-pronunciation-liaisons-4083657

      Another excellent site: https://forvo.com/search/verre/

      https://forvo.com/search/Je%20peux%20vous%20offrir%20un%20verre/


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GailPintoD

      I find this hard to understand. I am still on the basics of French and yet this "flirting" section of Duolingo is on a whole new level. Can't believe this is under the basics?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

      It is not part of Basics at all.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neshuzi

      but while we're talking let me offer you some free advice


      [deactivated user]

        Can I buy you a drink? SO Romantic


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayra91680

        THESE ARE SO LAME! AND ARE OFTEN GIVEN LITERAL TRANSLATIONS. Not that I am lacking for ingots, but 30 lingots is not worth it. This needs work.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kayra91680

        You can buy me a drink for 500 lingots.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kokokiki07

        I feel like "can i offer you a drink" would be translated better on this ocassion


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kokokiki07

        Yes,but let it be a vodka


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elle347235

        I thought buy is acheter. Could it be that offrir is offer?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

        Yes, but though it is common to say "buy" in English, it is not polite in French to mention paying for something for someone, so they use "offer" or rather "offrir" commonly. My dad would always pay the bill and never ask his guests anything about whether they wanted him to or not.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tamara477335

        why do they always offer drinks but not flowers, is it normal recently?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ALLintolearning3

        Who offers flowers? I just give flowers.

        Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.