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  5. "Papai, eu amo você."

"Papai, eu amo você."

Translation:Daddy, I love you.

March 8, 2016

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkyBrazil

I translated into English as "Papa, I love you." Papa is also used by some in English. Also Pop, Pappy, Dad, Daddy and probably several others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

And yet, currently DL does not accept papa for "papai" here. :(

But it also hurts me to use "você when telling someone I love him/her! =]

Especially coupled with "daddy" rather than "dad" (or better, "father") here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

DL now accepts, Papa. Thanks Danmoller. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissChampagne

Well, in some part of Brasil, they use "você" even if it's a close member of family or friends


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

I get that.

That is also why I did not say that it hurts all of us to use the Third Person for Papa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 160

We simply can't see it as 3rd person. It's actually our most usual pseudo-second-person pronoun.

Only in technical grammar it's a third person pronoun, but in our minds there isn't the slightest idea of it being a speacial treatment in any way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

Then that seems to be a Brazilian thing as all the Portuguese people I have talked to about você and the 2nd vs 3rd Person have all insisted it is a 3rd Person treatment pronoun (which they actually hardly ever use because they consider it a bit crude) and even expressed a bit of shock that anyone would consider it otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 160

Well, "grammatically", yes, it's a third person pronoun. But it means exactly "you". So in practice you simply can't interpret it as a third person pronoun...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimPierson

Why is Papai != Papa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Yeah. Papai = dad, daddy, papa (a cute way to call your father).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

Just my opinion. Others experiences may differ.

"Dad" is a way to refer to one's father in an informal way (not that cute). Adults refer to their father as "Dad".

"Daddy" is the way that children refer to their father. (very cute)

"Papa" or "pop" sounds old fashioned to me, but perhaps some people from the southern states in the USA still say that. I'm not sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CommeuneTexane

A transplant to Texas here, but as a former Army brat I traveled all over the US so I have a few observations.

"Daddy" is common among young children, whereas "Dad" is most common with older children and adults.

My father always called his dad "Pop" and that seems more common in the rural Pacific Northwest, where he is from. I've heard "Pop" in other rural places too. It might be more of a city vs small town thing.

I don't know the South extensively, but in Texas most older children call their father, "Dad". My younger children refer to their father as "Papa", while the teens say "Dad". I think that is due to the family French influence though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

Obrigada Tex. Great response!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

This is amusing. "Hipster" dads want to be called "papa".

http://www.thedailybeast.com/hipster-dads-now-want-to-be-called-papa

My daughters call their father "papa" and he is decidedly not hipster...just European.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luckyh13

It's all regional. I have three papas that are all grandfathers (divorce), and I'm a native American English speaker. Only "daddy" really covers a cute way to say father in any region using StandAmEnglish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anafbraga

Papa is spanish. Portuguese is papai = daddy or pai = dad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 160

The word "papa" in Portuguese can refer to:

  • Pope
  • Some kind of think soup. (pap, mash, but not mashed potatoes)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xConnorDx

Pai = father (formal) Papai = dad/daddy (more informal) Plus, Papa is Spanish There you go :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria.nils

Is it really reasonable to use papai (a term of endearment) and você (a term of politeness) in the same sentence like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 160

At least in Brazil, there is no formal treatment, unless you use "o senhor", "a senhora" and other more meaningful things.

"Você" and "tu" are just "you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria.nils

So there is no difference at all between você and tu?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria.nils

Never mind, I see it's explained in the notes to the skill (I'm using the app, so I only see it when I go looking...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Actually, "Você" is informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kajo76

"Eu amo você" is probably a literal translation, isn't it? I've also seen something like "Amo-te" for "I love you"... But then, this kind of verb + x combination I've yet to come across on Duo :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"Eu amo você" is what you hear all the time, and also "eu te amo". "Amo-te" is mainly used in Portugal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kajo76

Muito obrigada!

Am I right, that I could even leave the "eu" out of "eu te amo"? So it's sounding much like the Italian (?) "Ti amo"? Another question: A song from Nando Reis has the title "Ti amo". Is it common in Portuguese to use it also?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

(1) Yes, you can leave "eu" out of the sentence. Due to its ending, "amo" can only be related to "eu", but when a verb may be related to more than one pronoun/subject, you should add the pronoun to avoid ambiguity.

(2) Portuguese, Italian, Spanish and French are pretty much similar =)

(3) "Ti" is used after prepositions, as in "Tenho grande admiração por ti". "Ti amo" is not grammatically correct, but it is allowed for poetry, song, etc. It's what we call "licença poética" (http://www.infoescola.com/literatura/licenca-poetica/ -- http://www.recantodasletras.com.br/teorialiteraria/1244135). Also, "te" is pronounced like "ti". =)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkybrainy

I remember another exercise where the sentence to translate was "I love him", the translation was "eu o amo", and the comments said it's incorrect to say "eu amo ele".

What's the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"Eu amo ele" is commonly used in spoken language. Object pronouns are placed before verbs, but "Você" (as an object pronoun) is always placed after verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkybrainy

Thanks for explaining.

I understand that "eu amo ele" is commonly used, but is grammatically incorrect.

Is "eu amo você" also grammatically incorrect?

I thought the direct object pronouns of você are te/o/a


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"eu amo você" is right and commonly used also, but you can replace it with "o/a/te/lhe".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinkybrainy

Then I fail to see the grammatical difference between ele and você in eu amo ele/você, and don't understand why one is correct and one isn't (irrespective of both being used in spoken language)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

@pinky. Grammar includes many exceptions. As I stated before, you should use object pronouns before verbs, but "nocê" is an exception.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

So many choices in Portuguese:

[Eu] te amo./ Amo-te/ [Eu] amo você./ Amo você/ Eu o/a amo.

http://www.pellegrino.com.br/node/59637


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 160

The most common one in Brazil: "te amo". (Grammar Grandma disapproves)

Some regions may use "(eu) lhe amo". These regions started adopting "lhe" as a direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

Lhe! A quotation:

"...mencionemos a tendência atual dos brasileiros em transformar O/A em LHE. Essa invasão de área está acontecendo porque: 1º) o O tem pouco corpo fonético, baixa audibilidade, e portanto comunica mal; 2º) no conjunto dos pronomes oblíquos, LHE se encaixa melhor do que O: me, te, se, lhe, com a vogal (e) apoiada por consoante, em vez de uma só vogal (o, a), formam uma sequência mais espontânea."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danmoller
Mod
  • 160

The fist example is perfectly right, though. The second is a genuine case of changing "o/a" with "lhe".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YouEssican

Is the use of amar unusual for a father? That would be kind of creepy in Spanish*, more likely querer.

*EDIT: I should say Mexican Spanish- maybe it doesn`t sound so perverse elsewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

"Amar" is commonly used in Portuguese, no matter to whom it is related.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielew83

Te amo is a formal way to say "love" in Spanish.... typically used with family and husband/wives... Are you Mexican, because I feel pretty confident that is the same everywhere (my ex is venezuelan and I live in Spain and its the same). Querer can be used more for friends and bf/gf (before it gets too serious).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YouEssican

Western US, of Mexican origin. Most of the Spanish speaking population in my area (guessing 80%) is either Mexican or Mexican decent, though it does tend to morph a bit, even for first generation speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelancholicChen

In one of the previous exercise, I recall it used "a" as in "amo a" something/somebody (I can't remember the exact sentence), why this sentence doesn't use "a"?

Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

Formal grammar." Mãe, eu a amo." "a" = you or her.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maureen624957

I learned that after the verb "to love" one must use " a". Is that right ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No, the verb amar requires no preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kajo76

What would be the phrase for: "Rest in peace"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Descanse em paz

Hope it is not in real life...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kajo76

Thanks... But yes, it's in real life... :(

Papai, eu amo você! Descanse em paz!
Papa, ich liebe dich! Ruhe in Frieden!

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