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  5. "Svuoti le tasche."

"Svuoti le tasche."

Translation:You empty your pockets.

January 1, 2014

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoranMudronja

when you rob people, you use that line


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wxfrog
  • 1236

Or at airport security.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Or when you're getting ready to be finger-printed and have your mug-shot taken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin135869

You must add CAPISCI?! at the end, for extra effect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkCosdon

Why isn't "you empty the pockets" acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AernJardos

My understanding is that in Italian, ownership of certain things is implied. Things like pants, shirt, shoes, pockets, etc. It is assumed that a person is talking about the items belonging to the person in question unless specifically stated otherwise. So "he puts on his pants" even if is just "lui mette i pantaloni."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SphagnumPeatMoss

That doesn't sound right. Without context, there is no way to infer that from this sentence.

This could be in the context of a mom making a daughter do laundry chores, and, upon seeing the girl pick up a pair of dad's pants, tells her to "empty the pockets" because dad always leaves his keys in his pockets. It could be a customs officer instructing a traveler to empty the pockets of one of the gym bags in his luggage. It could be a mugger telling his accomplice to empty a victim's pockets while he holds them at gunpoint. There is simply no context that makes it safe to assume this sentence is being spoken to someone in reference to their own pockets that they happen to be wearing, which is why both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nayrad

It would actually be "lui si mette i pantoloni" but yea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Funest

It isn't surely implied, in this case he could be emptying another person's pocket. Furthermore, "You empty the pockets" is accepted [May, 2015]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

It's an imperative, so it doesn't allow for a pronominal subject. Also, Svuoti is 3rd person singular Imperative, apparently the formal Lei command or order.

It seems that -are verbs reverse 2nd and 3rd person singular in forming the Imperative. (Svuota is 2nd person singular informal imperative.) Not so with -ere and -ire verbs, which keep the normal 2nd person -i but use -a for 3rd person imperative, when the ordinary 3rd-person singular ending is -e.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuciusVorenusX

It is as of 17 Apr 16. (Of course, that's 2 years after your post, but anyway...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ken218622

It was for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelWat541241

I won't make a very good holdup man. No one would understand me trying to pronounce "svuoti"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dfjacobs

That "s" at the beginning is really hard to hear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hinnula

no problem, because "vuotare" exists and means exactly "svuotare" ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SPJacobson50

The problem I see, is earlier vuotare was not accepted because it was emptying a bottle and the explanation was "svuotare" was for liquids like in a bottle. With that explanation then vuotare would be better for this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquesFre5

I would have expected the use of vuotare rather than svuotare.... Now, which of both would allow me to get away more easily.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Perhaps because it sounds like [z].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/funnyiloveitaly2

When you join the carabinieri you need to practice that line along with making your stylish uniform look good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XXXMac

or just some laundry is comming.. you know, the tissue issue ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marc.libra

Haha they can't find anything in my pockets, because as we all know the knife is in the booth ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra977609

Where does it say "YOUR" pockets.. I can only see "le", meaning " the"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuciusVorenusX

It's implied. You can omit the possessive when the ownership is implied and clear enough from context. I'd give you link to my source, but it's a paper textbook and they don't link well.

The assumption would be that a person would be emptying their own pockets, rather than someone else's. Therefore the use of an expression like le sue etc is redundant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnchantedApril

I wrote "Empty the pockets" and it was accepted. I still don't know when a personal possessive pronoun will be accepted and when it won't. My guess was that in this instance it would be, but I used a more literal translation. In another lesson I translated "Gli uomini mangiano il pranzo" as "The men eat their lunch" and it was marked wrong. I haven't received a response from that site. How do Italians view the difference between these two examples?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeruMornie

Pocketses still not accepted, gollum, gollum!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Studentlingo

Svuotare and Vuotare difference, please!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Augustine2017

This sentence sounds so odd to me in english. I can imagine saying (imperative): "Empty your pockets." or "You must empty your pockets." but it doesn't feel natural to say "You empty your pockets."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuciusVorenusX

And "Myself I call Lucius" does not sound natural either, but nonetheless it's what "mi chiamo Lucius" literally means. It has to do with the fact that English and Italian are not the same language.

Some expressions can be translated word for word, and some can only be translated as an equivalent meaning. Let go of the first idea and embrace the second, and language learning becomes much easier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Signora1946

Empty the pockets is correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarionvanO

I don't see the word 'your' in Italian. Shouldn't it be : Svuoti le tue tasche ? Now it just says 'you empty pockets' but that was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuciusVorenusX

As per my reply to Sandra977609 above:

It's implied. You can omit the possessive when the ownership is implied and clear enough from context. I'd give you link to my source, but it's a paper textbook and they don't link well.

The assumption would be that a person would be emptying their own pockets, rather than someone else's. Therefore the use of an expression like le sue etc is redundant.

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