"Дети вас видят."

Translation:The children see you.

2 years ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Quieh
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Why not: the kids are seeing you?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nemesis_NaR

I have nothing against "kids", but as far as I know, "seeing you" means "dating you" and that makes absolutely no sense here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrienConr1

If anything, in English, it would be "The kids see you." Then they wouldn't be dating you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Apyrase

No, "the kids are seeing you" still makes sense in English. Using context, 'seeing' here would mean meeting and not dating. For example, if a father is in jail and still gets visits from his kids, another family member could say "well, at least the kids are seeing you." However, this isn't a good translation of the russian sentence.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Immanueldavid

could you do the kids see you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R_Andersson

Yes, ‘children’ and ‘kids’ are synonyms.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Immanueldavid

thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
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again : why is "the children are seeing you" considered wrong ! it is the same as "the children see you " or not ? if I say " I'm seeing you crossing the street " isn't it the same as " I see you crossing the street " my question is for native speakers of English (which I am not ). Thks.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martyn868085
  • "to be seeing someone" - idiomatic expression for dating, as pointed out above. You could say "the children are watching you", "I'm watching you cross the street", or "I see you crossing the street" - "I'm seeing you cross the street" would be unusual.
    Generally, to see has more of a passive notion (not gramatically, just the "feel" of the verb), it's something that happens to you - to watch is more active, it's something you actively do - but the main problem here is the idiomatic sense of "to be seeing".
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
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Thanks. So, during 60 years ( I am 76) I told my friends and later my english speaking customers around the planet that I was DATING THEM !! hahaha ! but none of them ever told me it was wrong, not even my best ENGLISH friend from Lemington Spa near Coventry ! I'll write him to complain !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Apyrase

Native english speakers will use context clues to decipher your intended meaning. If you have even a bit of an accent, they will pretty much autocorrect what you are trying to say in their mind without giving it much thought. This process is so automatic that they often don't even consider pointing out such errors when they hear them.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelKou11

It doesn't actually matter whether you say "to see" or "to watch", to English speakers it means the same thing, and we even say it as well. From a native English Speaker

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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See and Watch are two different verbs - compare to Hear and Listen. In some contexts I could see how someone might use "see" for "watch" ("Did you see the movie?"), but it's not 100% synonymous.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baldgymnastnurse
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As a native speaker, I would say it is unusual but grammatically correct. "What are you seeing now/What do you see now? I am seeing (I see) the children walking. When you use 'seeing' it emphasizes that it is a finite moment in time. For example: I see birds=I see birds now, I see birds every day, I see birds often, etc. BUT I am seeing birds=I see birds right now, this instant.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diogogomez

Do (Он/она) ви́дит and (Они) ви́дят sound the same?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaybury
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I don't think so: 'и' is pronounced kind of 'ee' so you have 'vydeet', whereas 'я' is 'ya', so 'vydyat'. This page is helpful for pronunciations: http://www.russianforeveryone.com/RufeA/Lessons/Introduction/Alphabet/Alphabet.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
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thanks for this link. i gave you a lingot. hope you'll receive it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaybury
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Ooh, thank you. I'm flattered, I don't think I've ever been given a lingot before.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
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well, there's always a first time for everything ! You helped me so I reward yoiu. That's how humans should behave.. Thanks again and have a nice week-end.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
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By the way, I see that the first three languages you are studying are national and official languages of my country. As to the fourth, well I'm speaking it daily since over 26 years but I learned it 60 years ago. So : tout de bon, Ich wuensche Ihnen ein schoenes Wochenend, qualsiasi cosa que lei vuole, posso aiutarVi.y le deseo exito en sus estudios. Au revoir, Auf wiedersehen, Ciao, hasta luego. My mother tongue is French. I'm Swiss and live between Peru and Ecuador in South America.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
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Thanks . just a question why do you say that Russian is NOT European ? On both sides, geographicaly and linguisticaly IT IS EUROPEAN. Indo-European like ALL the European languages except Finnish - Estonian- Sami ( Lapon) - Hungarian - Basque - and Turkish( if you want to consider this one as European , which I don't). If you ever come to Peru or Ecuador, just drop me a line to know in which country I will be at that time. I have my own business in Guayaquil/ Ecuador ( selling TEAK wood to INDIA with my partner who is from Mumbay) and in Peru I am collaborating with an old Swiss friend who owns an hotel in the Peruvian Amazon area. I'm in the process of building up a tourism business for Europeans mainly. That's why I want to add Russian to the 7 languages I already speak.I will be 77 in december next but still going strong ! So, you've been in CHILE ? I love that country but not it's earthquakes ! Between 1966 and 1991 I have been visiting it each year for 6 weeks, visiting our customers from Santiago to Antofagasta and from Santiago to Castro on the Chiloe island. I know it like all my pockets.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaybury
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I'm English, studied French and German at university, and learned Spanish on a gap year in Chile. I wanted to learn Italian simply because it seemed easy, and Duolingo has provided me with the means to do so. I started Russian, basically because it's a cool language, and I wanted to learn something non-European, and I must say, I'm enjoying it so far and it isn't as hard as I feared it might be. Nice to meet you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaybury
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Quite right, it's not accurate to say it is non-European, what I really mean is just unfamiliar. Russian sounds and looks so different from what I think of as European languages (French, German, Spanish etc.) that I think of it as non-European. I can truthfully say I speak 4 languages fluently (Eng, Fre, Ger, Spa) at the age of 23, and I hope to speak many more unusual languages by the time I retire. I'm sticking with Russian for now, then I will move on to Portuguese, which I think will mostly be a case of getting used to the pronunciation, and after that, possibly Arabic? Who knows... Thank you for the offer, I will keep it in mind if I go to South America. Yes I spent 5 months in Chile, in Chicureo, a suburb of Santiago, on a teaching placement during my gap year, with a short stint in Patagonia: I loved it there, they're such a happy bunch, and Patagonia is just phenomenal, but it's too far away from my extended family for me to want to move there permanently.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939
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Thanks for the answer. I knew you were quite young from your photo. At 24 I was speaking the 7 languages I speak now PLUS I could still read Latin from the book. Now I need the dictionary. Classical Greek is just a souvenir but I can read it as fast as when I was 16. With a dictionary and a grammar I can manage. It's been a huge help for learning Cyrilic. Now I am with Russian since April last. Hope to be able to speak enough by the end of the year to receive my Russian customers early in 2017. HOW DO YOU FEEL NOW THAT THE UK LEFT THE UE ? My very good friend from Lemington Spa near Coventry is very HAPPY. To say the truth I have - as a SWISS - always been opposed to the UE. Thanks to the powers that be, the Swiss people is the only one on earth with a political system which allows US, THE PEOPLE, to take the important decisions. It's not only in the hands of our so-called representatives who, generally speaking, only represent their own pockets !! This is a world-wide PLAGUE! As a businessman I NEVER liked the politicians. In my opinion, the UK - like Switzerland, Norway and Iceland, should not have problems standing on its own. We, the Swiss, are doing pretty well with our own currency. But I prefer to live in South America. I will NEVER learn Arabic. I have been travelling the whole Middle-East from 1966 till 1985 for business 2 months each year with the exception of Iraq-Syria-Jordan and Yemen but including Egypt. I didn't like it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaybury
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Golly, I'm rather jealous. There were a couple of kids at my school who had grown up in Europe, bilingual, speaking Spanish and English or whatever, it didn't seem fair at all. I did Latin until the age of 13, it was fine, but I didn't miss it. Never studied Greek, although my mother did point out similarities when I was learning the Russian alphabet. My tactic was just to sit down for an hour every day and write out a few more letters of the alphabet, and now I'm making vocab lists so that I have to keep using the letters.

As regards the EU, I voted In myself, but, well, too late now, and I have always carefully avoided discussing it - it doesn't seem worth the effort. Yes, I've never been to the middle East, so can't really say what it's like, but I'd like to learn the language just for interest's sake - it's a new alphabet, new grammatical systems, it'd be fun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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Unstressed "ya" does sound like an "i".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ONAOPE

Can I say 'deti vidyat vy'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaybury
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No. Possibly you could say 'deti vidyat vas', I'm not sure about the word order.

You can't use 'vy' here, as that is the nominative form of the word: you need the accusative form here, 'vas', because in this sentence, 'you' is the object (the person receiving the verb), not the subject (the person doing the verb).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ONAOPE

spasibo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amaybury
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Pozhaluysta

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadHatter601

Why doesn't it mean "The children (that) you see"? The sentence's order is so confusing...

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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Because YOU do not see the children, the CHILDREN see you. Let's break it down:

"Children" is in nominative case, so that is a very clear indicator right off the bat that that is the subject (that is not always the case in Russian, but it's a good thing to look for).

Видеть is conjuged for third person plural (-ят ending), which means it is conjugated for "they" and not "you". The only "they" in this sentence is the children. Side note: Russian sentences might exclude a nominative subject entirely and you might just see a third person verb... a common example would be in news reports - В Белом доме заявляют, что.... You can see that there is no "they" in the sentence. The easiest way to translate that would just be "The White House announces that". Anyway, I hope that's not too confusing at this level, it's just something to watch out for in the future.

ВАС is the Accusative or Genitive declension of Вы. That means that it is the object of an action or preposition. The only action in the sentence is видят, which means вас has to be in the accusative case and the "victim" of the action.

I hope that is clear. Please let me know if some or ... none of it is and I'll try to explain it better.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadHatter601

Yes, I get it now. Thank you very muuch. Fantastic explanatioon. Спасибо

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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Не за что! Also please watch out for ь и б, they are different characters: спасибо.

Have a good one!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadHatter601

Corrected, thanks again. :)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/isiah190

If this were ты, would if be "дети видёшь ты"?.ю So basically my question is would the placing of the word "you" (вы/ты) be different depending on which form you are using? Or would ты still come before видёшь? Or would it matter?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/problemslike
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No, it would be the same verb form but тебя instead of вас. The verb needs to agree with the subject, дети.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZanninaMargariti

Вас... genitive after видеть?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/diogogomez

I suppose it's accusative animate, because most verbs demand that case

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hawkeyecowgirl

i think accusative because 'you' is the direct object of the sentence

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MHeijO
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indeed, why not the children are seeing you, the verb 'can' is not even in this sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZAC66
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Why is it not "the children you see"? What would the sentence have to be for it to be "the children you see"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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Дети, которых вы видите

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonoBinder

Does it happend to you all that one question is repeating sometimes 4 to 8 times?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/doge157700

Why is "watch" not accepted?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keinemeinung
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That would be смотреть (они смотрят).

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haki.76
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why not "видут"

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kundoo
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It's an exception. There are seven verbs that end with "-ить" in the infinitive form but conjugate like the verbs ending with "-ить": смотреть (to look), видеть (to see), ненавидеть (to hate), зависеть (to depend), терпеть (to endure), обидеть (to hurt one's feelings), вертеть (to twist, to twirl).

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kristenpeters

Вас means both you proper and you all, right? I said "the children see you all" and it said I was incorrect. You cannot tell from this context if it is speaking to one person or more than one person.

2 months ago
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