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  5. "Are you eating cheese?"

"Are you eating cheese?"

Translation:Dych chi'n bwyta caws?

March 10, 2016

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariuszlist

Is "Dych chi yn bwyta caws" also acceptable in writing? I understand it is pronounced as Dych chi'n, but is that standard spelling?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdfsoccer101

How would you differentiate "are you eating cheese" and "do you eat cheese?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

You can't other than from context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdfsoccer101

Interesting. Also bugging me, what is the difference between "I am making breakfast" and "I make breakfast?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

In English? Not much other than "I am making" suggests that you are doing it at this moment in time whereas "I make" is more just a statement that you do at least sometimes make breakfast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdfsoccer101

No I meant in Welsh how do you distinguish them? Because the lessons aren't differenciating and I don't want to be learning wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

Well mostly we just used "Dwi'n +verb" for both of them but there are present tense endings which can be added to verbs, i.e Rhedeg= To run, Rheda i=I run etc with different ending for each person. These do still exist but they are rarely used and I only know them because I asked my Welsh teacher in school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jdfsoccer101

Okay, last question. When do you use yn/ i'n and when do you not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EllisVaughan

Pretty much any sentence that uses a form of "bod" (dw/roeddwn etc) also takes a yn/i'n (but not the emphatice i.e "Ellis dw i" doesn't need an 'n at the end). A few exceptions are when using eisiau/isio and angen(need) these do not take yn/i'n . Also if the sentences contains wedi the yn/i'n is not used. I'm sure there are other rules, but you should just pick them up as you go along.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TyNoOutlet

Caws is way to close to the word for soup: "cawl"

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