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  5. "Ei feiro e"

"Ei feiro e"

Translation:His biro

March 11, 2016

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/resueman

What's a biro??????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nitedemon

Same confusion when I saw this lol, I thought it was British way of calling grandma... Turns out it's a type of ballpoint pen: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/biro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Well, ballpoint pen in general, I'd say.

Originally a brand of ballpoint pen but now used as a generic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nitedemon

Like Jacuzzi as hot tub?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, or Scotch tape/Sellotape for self-adhesive tape, hoover for vacuum cleaner, Band-Aid for an adhesive bandage, Xerox for photocopy, etc. etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

A "plaster" for "Band-Aid", surely!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deyan161

These mutations are catching! Tried to translate this as 'his ben'! More seriously, I would not translate 'beiro' (new word) as 'pen' (generic word for any writing implement that uses ink, including things that are NOT biros, eg felt-tips, fountain pens, even quill pens, ) but 'ballpoint pen' or 'biro'....What is the Welsh for pen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chellerystick

Wait, so does beiro mean pen or does it mean ballpoint? (It matters in my life--I use fountain pens a lot in addition to ballpoints and rollerballs. Also Sharpies but they are what I call a marker.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/allenfrang

Ballpoint is accepted. Ballpoint pen is not. Perhaps it should?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iAmOnDuolingoToo

"ei" should be pronounced "i" should it not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

It's the "ay" sound in English "day".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iAmOnDuolingoToo

It's spelt that way but I'm sure it's pronounced "i".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Ah right, I though you were just referring to the diphthong ei not the word ei. In careful speech the word ei "his/her" is pronounced "ay" in English "day" but you're right that in everyday colloquial speech it's usually said i.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uncle_sam123

So does "ei" mean both his and her, and the difference is shown through the mutation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Exactly.

So with nouns that do not mutate, you can't tell whether it means "his" or "her" unless the additional pronoun is included after the noun, e.g. ei nain o "his grandmother", ei nain hi "her grandmother".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabrinaStepp

Looks like it is also being used as brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertGlass

I think biro is an old fashioned term. I remember people using the term but not in the last decade or so. Maybe old people still say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

I must be very old then! And you must interact with a very narrow range of people if you've never heard "biro" in the last ten years. (But then, maybe you don't live in GB&I -- so, sorry if I jumped the gun.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertGlass

Yes, I'm not in Europe at all (I guess England isn't either tho now) Perhaps it's regional, that it's died out in some countries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Point taken, DG. I would like to point out, though, that Wales (which is where I am) is, just like England and Scotland, very much in Europe. The facts of geography can't be altered by withdrawal from a political union which in any case won't happen -- if it does -- before March 2019 at the earliest!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertGlass

I'm waiting for the results for a poll amongst my friends as to which term they use. Doing a search on the local broadsheet newspaper, there were 153 references to biro and 24,700 references to pen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

Interesting. Don't forget, though, that while all biros are pens, not all pens are biros (ballpoints)! As well as biros/ballpoints, the category "pen" includes inter alia rollerballs, felt-tips (markers), and fountain pens. I'm old enough to remember that at school (where biros were forbidden) we had inkwells and dip pens (though we were allowed to use our own fountain pens). I'm not ancient enough, however, ever to have used a quill pen... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertGlass

Hmm, just had a brainwave to check the online shopping sites for some UK supermarkets to see what they call the item. Tescos has a category "Stationary > Pens" and out of the 163 items there, none are described as "biro", but many are "ball pens" or "ballpoint pens". The same thing with Sainsburys and Asda. This result is intriguing.

I couldn't find any Welsh-language online stationary shops, so I couldn't check whether beiro is used in Welsh shops, or just "pen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leillia

I had no idea what a biro meant!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCarver

Of course, pens were known in Wales long before Laszlo Biro, a Hungarian inventor, patented an improved ball-point pen in 1938.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertGlass

Hmm, just had a brainwave to check the online shopping sites for some UK supermarkets to see what they call the item. Tescos has a category "Stationary > Pens" and out of the 163 items there, none are described as "biro", but many are "ball pens" or "ballpoint pens". The same thing with Sainsburys and Asda. This result is intriguing.

I couldn't find any Welsh-language online stationary shops, so I couldn't check whether beiro is used in Welsh shops, or just "pen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yottskry

I hope it doesn't say "Stationary", as that means "not moving". Pens are a type of stationEry ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibisc

Yes, because the 'e' is for 'envelope' and the 'a' is for ''anging around'!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dim-ond-dysgwr

There's a picture, by the way, of a pre-war mobile (i.e. non-stationary) shop here: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/pin/351491945893596027/

The photo was even taken in Wales -- so it truly is a siop symudol...! :)

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