1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Tu sei un ragazzo."

"Tu sei un ragazzo."

Translation:You are a boy.

January 19, 2013

100 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UtsavThapliyal

What is the difference between use of sei/é? I can't understand.. help plz.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2525

Everyone has their own conjugation:
io sono - I am
tu sei - you (singular) are
lui/lei è - he/she is
noi siamo - we are
voi siete - you (plural) are
loro sono - they are


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/james440120

I wish i could save this cheat sheet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whocareswastaken

screenshot maybe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2525

You just need to know the infinitive (in this case, essere) and put it into a conjugator:

https://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?parola=essere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JayBretado

Rae.F there is alot more to that such as Le Suo Le Sue also there can be sentences like Tu mangi or Voi mangi, if anyone also gets confused using that Voi is a term to use when being plural but to yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2525

I was conjugating "essere". "Le sue" and "il suo" are just possessive adjectives. "Voi" has its own conjugation that's different from "tu".


[deactivated user]

    Confused @.@ Is "un" for boy and "una" for girl?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    "un" is "a/an" for masculine nouns and "una" is "a/an" for feminine nouns.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyleeLewis

    un-male una-female un ragazzo - a boy una ragazza- a girl un gatto- a cat, una mela- an apple


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rasool66

    Thanks but what about things


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    In Italian, all nouns are classified either "masculine" or "feminine". It has nothing to do with being male or female.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyleeLewis

    You are a boy can be translated as Tu sei un ragazzo or Lei è un ragazzo


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EcceRome

    Additionally, Lei is feminine. Lui is masculine. Another reason why lei would not be appropriate.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyleeLewis

    lei=she Lei= formal you

    http://italian.about.com/cs/grammar/ht/formalinformal.htm

    i hope the following will explain the differences and put an end to the discussion.

    As if learning a new language weren't difficult enough, Romance languages such as Italian have separate forms of address in formal versus informal situations. This How-To has quick, step-by-step instructions on how to use the formal and informal subject pronouns tu, voi, lei, and loro.

    Here's How:

    There are four ways of saying you in Italian: tu, voi, Lei, and Loro. Tu (for one person) and voi (for two or more people) are the familiar forms, used only with family members, children, and close friends. Use Lei (for one person, male or female) and its plural Loro in more formal situations to address strangers, acquaintances, older people, or people in authority. Capitalize Lei and Loro to distinguish them from lei (she) and loro (they).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyleeLewis

    Lei- she or formal you :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisaHaskin

    My travel italian teacher says if you use "tu" to someone you don't know, you will be corrected. That you should use "lei" instead. Is this true? If so, why are we focusing so much on tu?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
    Mod
    • 2666

    That's a huge oversimplification: you'll be corrected just as well if you use Lei with people who expect tu. You should generally use Lei with people older than you or people you have to show respect to, and you definitely have to use tu with children and teenagers (in this specific sentence, you would never call a "ragazzo" Lei), but in the middle there's a whole lot of social awareness and reading the situation: tu can be friendly or rude, and Lei stiff or polite. I remember my English teacher in university asked us why the rest of the staff used Lei with her in writing and tu in person. In front of a computer people generally use tu (the software does too), and over in the English course there's plenty of people that don't understand why Duolingo would translate you with Lei. As for why the course uses tu more than Lei, I think it's just that it's much less confusing and ambiguous.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/10KatieSutton21

    Whats the difference between the boy and girl


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    the boy = il ragazzo
    the boys/the children = i ragazzi
    the girl = la ragazza
    the girls = le ragazze


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgiaKay3

    I thought this was a question, but it was a statement. Has anyone got any tips to help me remember how this works? -don't judge I'm a beginner


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nilcea007

    I have never heard the word " Lad " for ragazzo


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    It's a regional term, mostly British.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WiryVoldemort

    This reminds me of a song called Vivo Per Lei. Listen to it by Andrea Bocelli and Giorgia. It changed my life, this love song, but in a good way.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/focusezz

    i don't hear the "un", all i hear is "tu sei ragazzo"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    You'll need to flag it next time and report a problem with the audio. This forum is not the place to report technical errors.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariemoore2

    Whats the verb unconjugated?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheverepr

    What does "sei" means by itself?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    As a verb, it's the second person singular present tense of "to be" (you are).
    http://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?verbo=essere
    As a number, it's 6.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RubySee1

    It's hard to pronounce ragazzo


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hjz418

    How come sei is also six?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    It just is. Plenty of languages have homophones.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanNdenga

    What is the formal version of you in Italian?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    Lei. It takes the same verb conjugation as "lui/lei". In writing, it and all its associated words take a capital letter:
    Lei, Suo, Sua, Suoi, Sue


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twait53655

    Why is "You are a male." Unacceptable?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    A dog or a bird can be male. An 80-year-old grandfather is male.

    "Ragazzo" is specifically "boy", a human male child.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    Any language you're not fluent in will sound fast because you're not keyed in to where the word breaks are, so it all runs together. English sounds just as fast to those who don't speak it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Acesuurin

    When do we use Sei , Un , Uno, and è?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    sei is the present tense "to be" conjugation for the singular "you": (tu) sei
    è is the present tense "to be" conjugation for "he" or "she": lui è, lei è

    un and uno are like the English "a/an" but follow different rules:
    http://italian.about.com/library/fare/blfare111a.htm
    http://www.italianlanguageguide.com/grammar/articles/indefinite-article.asp


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isaactd

    I used an indefinite "il" here instead of a definite "un" What does this mean?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    "il" is one of the definite articles, it means "the." "un" is one of the indefinite articles, it means "an/an."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/razrushost

    il means the, un means a. Like, Un bambino=A boy or Il ragazzo=The boy.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonDoeDloo

    Sei is also six? Why!?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    English has words like that, too. Lots of languages do.

    Bear: a large animal
    Bear: to carry/to endure

    Right: correct
    Right: opposite of left

    Light: opposite of dark
    Light: opposite of heavy


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-ICanDigElvis-

    thanks that helps a lot. going down in my notes


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmaybay

    Can someone tell me why it is sei. And not sono. I cant remember why and therefore i always get this question wrong because i forget


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    io sono = I am
    tu sei = you (singular, familiar) are
    lui/lei/Lei è = he/she is / you (singular, formal) are
    noi siamo = we are
    voi siete = you (plural, familiar) are
    loro/Loro sono = they/you (plural, formal) are


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    io = I
    tu = you (singular)
    lui = he
    lei = she
    noi = we
    voi = you (plural)
    loro = they

    io sono = I am
    tu sei = you are
    lui/lei è = he/she is
    noi siamo = we are
    voi siete = you are
    loro sono = they are

    un = a/an (masculine)
    una = a/an (feminine)

    ragazzo = boy
    ragazzi = boys
    ragazza = girl
    ragazze = girls

    Put all that together for this lesson:
    Tu sei un ragazzo = You are a boy.

    I hope that answered your question, because you did not specify what you don't understand.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bittersweetz._

    in French we say tu SONT un garcon, but in italien we say tu SEI un ragazzo. pretty similar huh?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2525

    No, in French it's tu es and ils/elles sont.

    Also, there are bound to be a number of similarities between French and Italian, since they both developed from Latin.

    Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.