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  5. "Дай нож, пожалуйста."

"Дай нож, пожалуйста."

Translation:Give me a knife, please.

March 14, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachel270

I can see why the "me" might be understood, but why is it wrong to say "Give the knife, please"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cptchuckle

I don't think it is colloquial to omit "me"; I've never heard regular people omit it in regular speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

That doesn't really make sense in English. Give to whom, or what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ethank47

It's commonly said, especially in spoken speech. If you're the one saying it it's implied that it should be given to yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

Not where I am, but maybe it's American.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimidov

You can only leave out the 'me' in this sentence if it shows up in a previous sentence or has come up in the conversation before, and even then, adding it is preferable to keeping it in, as without, the sentence sounds incomplete, informal and lazy. I'm with Theron on this one.

I will only use 'give the knife' (or item, whichever) when I'm talking to my most obnoxious of brothers, implying an informal setting, and this is a repeat request which he is willfully ignoring because he is a.. uh.. a brother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shah29i

Do Americans Never say "give it!" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenCostell3

It's not that "Give X" is never said in America. To me, at least, it's that it sounds rather rude, and like something which would never be combined with "please," unless the "please" was dripping with sarcasm or intentional irony. If пожалуйста wasn't there, I'd let "Give the knife" be added, but I just can't really imagine "Give the knife, please," being said with sincerity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ngahaba

This sounds perfectly normal where I'm from as well, I mean the informal of this as far as im concerned "ta" or "ta, please" hahaha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reena_March

В чём разница между "Дай" и "Дайте"? Formality?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theron126

"Дай" is the "ты" form, "дайте" the "вы" form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reena_March

Спасибо как всегда :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HotCheezzz

Why is there no мне used though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

It's implied. You can use it if you want to, but it's not necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Markus342007

There is no "мне", so the literal translation would be "give a knife". At least this should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruno241677

DL is confusing. Or does that mean that дай мне нож is wrong ? I can easily see mostly in movies... Give the knife or give that knife. Then I can consider more easily me with a knife than with the knife. Give a knife and give the knife isn't the same. But in Russian there is no article to make the difference..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guido506552

нож is pronounced "нош" : is it correct ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kundoo

Yes, voiced consonants tend to get devoiced in the end of a word (unless the next word starts with another voiced consonant but that is not the case here).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guido506552

Thank you. This is the first time I realize the sound "j" (as in French jamais) is necessarily voiced.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matti137191

If a surgeon needs a knife, but the assisting nurse does not notice it, another nurse can say "give the knife". As it is obvious who needs the knife, "him/her" is not needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Corrie699358

I do not see the russian word for me in this sentence. Perhaps it is not colloquial to omit 'me'. But when I assume this sort of thing in other sentences, I am wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/languagepassion

to tell the truth, this literally means "give the knife please"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eli281407

My microphone doesn't work and it says,I'm wrong

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