"Please"

Translation:Os gwelwch chi'n dda

March 16, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joblackest

You will sometimes see 'ogydd' as shorthand, especially in emails, to abbreviate os gwelwch chi'n dda

May 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily940246

How does os gweli d'in da translate LITERALLY?

April 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krestazza

I think it's something like "as you see fit"

April 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrArbo

As far as I understand it:
os - if
gwelwch - to see (future tense)
chi - you
yn - has many uses. Used with adjectives (e.g. good) to form adverbs (e.g. well).
da - good

So semi-literally "if you see well" but I've seen it translated as "if you would" or similar.


(My original question which mizinamo is answering below: However, I would like to know why the informal form is "gweli" instead of "gwela" (note on commands))

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's not the command form, it's the future form (which in older Welsh was a combined present-future tense, while in modern it's nearly always just future).

gwelaf i, gweli di, gwêl/gweliff/gwelith o/e, gwelwn ni, gwelwch chi, gwelant hwy/gwelan nhw

Also, yn is used with adjectives to form adverbs, e.g. Mae hi'n canu'n dda "she sings well".

So I'd translate it literally as "if you see well".

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrArbo

that makes a lot more sense, I never really understood how it was a command. Thanks for the explanation, I'll fix my comment.

So to thank yourself you'd say "os gwelaf i'n dda", that's good to know.

May 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cartref

Why are there three translations of please in this unit?

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because different people in Wales use different words, and it's good to be able to recognise all of them?

Also, Welsh distinguishes between singular and plural/formal "you", so you'll need two versions for that alone.

March 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bex42

The form changes depending on who is being addressed. The middle part, which changes, the "gweli di'n" part, means "you see" on its own. As mizinamo says, Welsh has more than one "you" form and the verb (gweld) changes to match.

April 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

I'm confused again, 'gwelwch, gweli, gweld'? Which goes with which? Do all verbs have this level of variation? 'Mynd' for example has stayed the same if it's 'dw i'n mynd' or 'dych chi'n mynd' so why does this verb insist on changing?

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alice737189

the present in welsh is constructed with the verb to be, dw i, rwyt ti, etc, so when you use mynd you're actually saying "I am going, you are going, etc...". For all other tenses and modes, you will decline it, so I went is Es i, you went, Est it, he went, aeth e etc...

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

Oh I thought that to say, for example, "I went home" would be "dw i wedi mynd adre" with the "wedi" part making it past tense, at least that it what Duolingo has taught me so far, does " es i" have the same meaning?

And is "gwelwch" then the future tense form of the infinitive "gweld" (also declined to 2nd person plural/ formal 'you) ?

thank you for your help by the way, it's appreciated.

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alice737189

"dw i wedi mynd adre" means "I have gone home" - it's a different past tense. Es i means I went. Duolingo (and similar approaches) are great but this is what happens when you don't explain grammar ahah :D

Gwelwch is present/future (although for the future you have again different constructions).

Simply put the expression means "If you see well/good/proper"

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

Right okay, is it along the same lines as "I see the car" and "I am seeing the car", the former is stative and the latter is progressive? In the english translation "see" is the infinitive verb but this isn't the case with the welsh Gwelwch.

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alice737189

"I see the car" and "I'm seeing the car" in English are both present (simple and progressive respectively). In Welsh you don't make this distinction: --> Dw i'n gweld yr car (not sure about mutations sorry... but you get the gist...)

"I have seen the car" in English is (confusingly) called present perfect and is past tense which in Welsh is constructed with wedi: --> Dw i wedi gweld yr car (again don't trust me on mutations...)

"I saw the car" English simple past, grammatically speaking "preterite" : --> "Gwelais i'r car" (probably a mutation somewhere...)

Hope it helps :)

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash473779

Thank you for all your help!

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alice737189

gwelwch (chi) is the second plural / formal "you (pl) see", gweli (ti) is second singular/ singular "you (sin) see", Gweld is the infinitive and you don't need it here

and yes, all verbs are declined

August 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kalirush

Why is "os gwelwch yn dda" not allowed? That was the correct answer on another question for "please".

April 1, 2018
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