"Wedyn"

Translation:Afterwards

March 17, 2016

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Wedyn is from wedi hyn (after this).

You'll also hear wedi 'ny in the south, from wedi hynny (after that).

March 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Why not "after"?

October 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

Could be, as long as you mean the adverb not the preposition e.g. Es i i siopa yn y dre ond dod adre wedyn (I went shopping in town but came home after(wards)/then).

October 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Diolch!

October 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiltReynolds

I've been pondering wedyn. According to Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru, it can mean afterwards, after this, subsequently, later, then; also, on the other hand, after all. (http://welsh-dictionary.ac.uk/gpc/gpc.html, search for wedyn)

I'm wondering if our English phrase, Well, then... is taken from the Welsh, Wedyn? I can easily imagine an English speaker mis-hearing Wedyn, taking it to be Well, then. Otherwise, I cannot think of why we would preface then with well. Why not just say, Then?

A cursory search for the phrase "well then" has yielded nothing so far.

But, at least it provides for me an easy memory hook: Wedyn sounds like well then, so I remember that it may mean, then.

June 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

It's a nice theory, but I very much doubt it. Both well and then are native English words (cf. Proto-Germanic *wala and *þan) and their usage makes sense in English and isn't at all similar to how wedyn is used in Welsh. It's just a coincidence that some of the sounds in both phrases are similar. If it helps you remember the Welsh word though, that's not a bad thing.

June 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiltReynolds

I had a nagging feeling that my theory was more fantasy than factual. And I was hoping for a response just as you provided. Diolch!

June 7, 2019
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