"Er rennt durch den Wald."

Translation:He is running through the forest.

6 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DieDeutscheKatze

The prepositions 'durch, ohne, gegen, fuer, um' will always be in accusative. An easy way to remember this is dogfu.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Twoquiche
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Ah, the famous martial art practised by dogs.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonathanDu937423

You forgot bis and entlang. I remember GUFBODE

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gtandes
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Fubdoge is easier to remember. Thanks for all your inputs guys!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aetheling

I sing "durch, fuer, gegen, ohne, um" to the tune of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star." Also you can sing the dative prepositions "aus, ausser, bei, mit, nach, seit, von, zu" to "The Blue Danube."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcounts
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Ausgezeichnet. Big help. Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roostifer

"er" or "ihr", it is difficult to hear the difference...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/helenvee

That's an ongoing problem. I'd suggest you report it. I have.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamalawk
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Ihr is pronounced slightly different to Er. Er sounds like "Air", and Ihr sounds more like "Ear".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayBayat

"Wald" translates as "wood" or in certain English contexts "woods", whereas "Forst" is the equivalent of "forest" - maybe yet another US / UK cultural distinction?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
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No, we use forest and wood/woods in a similar manner.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JayBayat

In the UK, most people would regard 'woods' as being smaller (hence someone's earlier reference to a named place) whereas 'a forest' is generally much larger and most frequently owned/managed by the Forestry Commission

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertEMaxwell

I'd say that's right for US English. The distinction isn't strict, but usually 'forest' does imply a larger expanse. Also, I'd say 'forest' also implies deep wilderness - if the edge of someone's property ends in woodlands, it's almost always referred to as 'the woods.'

If you switch them up, it usually doesn't matter, but it seems odd somehow to talk about "the thousands of miles of Alaskan woods [versus 'Alaskan forest']" or the 'forest in the local park.'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eskoala
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There's another sentence that insists on the singular!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fentan
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isn't it "dem Wald"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DB288

No, "durch" is a preposition that takes the accusative case. Therefore when used with a singular masculine noun the definite article is "den".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/revmdj
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I translated it as "He is running through the wilderness," which seems like it would be more accurate (wald>wild>wilderness is a reasonable linguistic progression, no?). But it was wrong! :-(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duoderSie

There is almost certainly an etymological connection here, whether maybe not in the direction you imply though. However "Wald" means wood and "Wildnis" means wilderness.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gobochul
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what about "across the forest" ? It got marked wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duoderSie

No, you run across a field but through a wood/forest

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lixfuha
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Is not correct to say "He runs throughout the forest"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josephkmet1

All I can think of is "Run, Forest, run

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laura.USA

Me, too. I came just to see if anyone else did. :D

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VKVyas2

Why continuous present tense is used, "He runs though the forest" given wrong

3 months ago
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