https://www.duolingo.com/StevenJ.Sacco

Looking for Turkish help!

StevenJ.Sacco
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 22
  • 17
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 41

Just started learning Turkish. Any tips on learning Turkish? Other advice?

2 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Slydiad
Slydiad
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 1214

I absolutely agree with garpike. For me, because the grammar is so different and there are so few cognates, it takes a lot longer to really cement a Turkish lesson in my brain than it did for me to feel confident with either Spanish or German lessons. That's ok! Part of what's fun and cool about Turkish as an English speaker is that it isn't related to any language that I've studied before. Focus on making sure you understand what you're learning, not on how fast you're going.

The Turkish team is incredibly helpful and responsive, so reading through the comments section for each question at least once, even if I don't think I have a question about that particular sentence, has been really useful. And if you've read through the comments and still have questions, don't be afraid to ask. Everyone I've seen in the course so far is really nice and supportive!

Most of all, I'd say stick with it. It can seem daunting, but if you take it one lesson at a time it's absolutely doable, and it feels really good to look back and know you've come from not understanding a concept at all to totally getting it. SOV word order felt incredibly alien to me at first, but then it clicked. Possession being marked on both the possessor and the possessed felt incredibly alien, but then it clicked. I am currently muddling my way through the narrative/reported past tense. I don't entirely get it yet, but I trust that eventually it will click.

The neat thing about studying a non-Indo-European language like Turkish is that it really does broaden your mind. I've had more "What?! Language can work like that?!?" moments than I can count. Usually, it's in a happy/cool/approving way, but I admit that occasionally, at first, big differences strike me as unfair and frustrating. But that's a silly way to look at it. I do far better when my attitude is that whatever it is that's being hard is a puzzle I wouldn't be getting to solve if I weren't learning a language that was so far removed from what I already know, and lucky me for getting the rare special puzzle.

Also, Turkish rewards sustained study. It is is very, very logical. There are some irregulars, but not many at all compared to Spanish and German. Many (probably most, if you count SOV word order and cases) of the grammatical constructions are unfamiliar to English speakers, but once you understand them, you can almost always trust them. The language gets easier and more familiar over time.

One negative about the Duolingo Turkish course that the team have been perfectly open about is that, unlike for many of the other Duolingo languages, the text-to-speech options in Turkish aren't great. They picked the best one they could, but it isn't perfect. Because of this, it's especially helpful to supplement the Duolingo Turkish course with exposure to actual Turkish speakers speaking Turkish. Personally I like the podcasts Turkish Tea Time and TurkishClass101. Neither is perfect (and the latter is especially annoyingly ad-heavy), but it's good to hear the language pronounced in a native accent, but still slowly and clearly to help those of us who are still learning understand.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zubiz
zubiz
  • 22
  • 14
  • 9
  • 8
  • 4
  • 2

Excellent post that gives insight into what it is like to be learning turkish. I fully agree about the TTS engine and complained about it sometime ago and got the same answer you mentioned: no better TTS software.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
  • 25
  • 24
  • 22
  • 20
  • 19
  • 19
  • 18
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 1162

Don't rush; the Turkish course covers a lot of absolutely essential grammatical concepts very quickly. Don't expect to sail through them as if it were a Romance or Germanic language (although if you can, you're a better man than I am). Practise and repeat things a lot. Makes notes! Get into the habit of thinking in SOV word-order when you compose or translate Turkish; use timed practice to force yourself to.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yasemin.Sah

At the beginning suffixes may seem hard but the truth is they are not. You will get used to using them properly in short time. If you need any help, don't hesitate to ask. Good luck!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muriz6
Muriz6
  • 22
  • 211

Ouch, I am a Bosnian and 2 months ago I started learning Turkish on Duolingo. I cannot learn using my native Bosnian language and I learn from English /ENG-TUR and vice versa/. I speak English pretty well so it is not a problem. In Bosnian there are many Turkish words (same in Serbian and Croatian). The concept of SOV language is a bit problematical, but slowly and gradually I am learning. I finish every level of every branch before I proceed to another branch. Now I am on Present Continuos Tense. Turkish is an interesting language and I would like to finish the tree and see how good would I be in Turkish. I am not too optimistic since they speak very fast :). Anyhow, I am continuing the course. I thank to Duolingo and to the contributors to the Turkish course. Cok tesekkur ederim.

5 months ago
Learn Turkish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.