"Ich werde morgen mehr gelesen haben."

Translation:I will have read more tomorrow.

January 5, 2014

56 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeeChinedu

I'm not a native speaker of English, but the construction "I WILL HAVE read more tomorrow" sounds a bit unusual. "WOULD" seems a little more common. Could anyone help?

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paganinii

This sentence is awkward, but what "will have" happened will come to be in the future, while "would have" failed to happen in the past.

July 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HamzadogyX

So is there a way to phrase it better?

June 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MN_Honig_Dachs

I'm not sure I understand the question. Are you trying to 1) figure out "would have" v. "will have" 2) phrase the English more naturally 3) phrase the German differently?

June 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stevenjayipad

Would not be spoken in usa. Not natural..

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melpatience

Whats wrong with "I WOULD have read more tomorrow

June 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oqopo

'I would' is not in the future tense.

July 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antepoljar

Why not? I would have read tomorow if I havent done it today.

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

"I would have read (more) tomorow" is a condition and no future tense.

~ Ich würde morgen (mehr) gelesen haben, wenn ...

In the german sentence it is even more visible, because "würde" is never a future tense.

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zeno9666

It sounds more like making a wish, I guess.

July 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cantabile9923015

can I put "mehr" before "morgen"? like ich werde mehr morgen gelesen haben

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1091

no

February 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlez

is "i will have read more BY tomorrow" not correct??

January 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pellucidon

"I will have read more by tomorrow" means (to me) "I will have read more by the start of tomorrow".

"I will have read more tomorrow" means (to me) "I will have read more by the end of tomorrow".

There's also another implication in English where "tomorrow" could extend out into the future, e.g. "the world of tomorrow" doesn't actually refer to the next day after today but more "the world of the future".

July 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClassiDuo

I think your interpretation is right at the level of connotation. When someone says "I will have (done x) by tomorrow," it connotes that as soon as tomorrow arrives, the action will already be completed. If it is not completed until later into the day, the speaker is not necessarily speaking falsely, but it could be construed as problematic.

September 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shareida

omg how do u keep a steak so long! xo

April 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee_van_Oetz

Step 1: grow a really big ox Step 2: turn into a really long steak Step 3: do not eat or shorten the steak Easy.

May 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djdejong

"...by tomorrow" in itself doesn't necessarily imply whether it's by the end or the beginning, as with simply "...more tomorrow", though perhaps if I was trying to connote something while not technically making myself liable I might use one over the other...

February 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

I'm not 100% sure. In English there is a slight difference in meaning, although it's so subtle that I can't really articulate it. I don't know if the same distinction exists in German either. Regardless though, without the by the wording is closer to the German so is probably a better translation, even if the meaning is almost the same.

February 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piffany

I don't think there's a difference in English. Yes, they sound different, and they are different from "I will read more tomorrow", but the message conveyed is the same. If you'd like to argue otherwise, please provide a scenario in which one can be used but not the other.

May 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

The difference is more one of connotation when used in the future perfect. The circumstances in which they are used are usually going to be the same, but that doesn't mean they are identical or interchangeable.

It's far simpler to see the difference in other tenses. For example, "I will read more in June" is totally different from "I will read more by June". The former indicates that the action will take place during June, while the latter indicates that it will take place before June.

The distinction blurs significantly in the future prefect though, as the tense by definition indicates something that will happen before something else. However, I feel like the by version also has the connotation of "at the latest". In this specific case (i.e. where the point in time is tomorrow) it is even blurrier since the interim period is less than a day.

I can think of a few examples where one is far more likely to be used than the other, but none that are strictly mutually exclusive. For example, by tomorrow is more likely to be used in relation to a deadline ("Don't worry, I'll have done this by tomorrow.") while without the by it is more likely to be used when a related event is due to take place then or when looking forward to a milestone being passed ("Just think, tomorrow I will have graduated.").

May 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piffany

I agree with the examples you gave in the second paragraph, but I think it's different when paired with the "will have done" structure.

Basically, I can think of two things one would want to express when saying "I will have read more in/by June" (suppose it's May now):

  1. The amount of reading I do in June ALONE will exceed that of May.
  2. The CUMULATIVE amount of reading I do will increase once it's June.

To express the first idea, I could use "I will have read more in June", but it's far more natural to simply say "I will read more in June". As for the second idea, I would use "I will have read more by June".

May 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sailor517

DLEZ, Chalk it up to “computer-iese”. I got the same error! The machine is looking word for word translation. By the time I finish my German tree, I will forget my English cheers

March 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Squonkalini

I'm wondering how one actually would say "I will have read more by tomorrow" in German.

April 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmbka

Morgen werde ich mehr gelesen haben. That means, I will read today and by tomorrow I will have read more.

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelaSharot

Technically we should be saying I shall. I will is insistent, as is somebody has said, you won't and you retort I WILL!

January 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

Are you suggesting it should be "I shall have read more tomorrow"? If so, that seems incredibly non-idiomatic to me. While shall has been historically prescribed in place of will as the first person future auxiliary (e.g. "I shall read") the distinction is an artificial one. (See also: uses of shall and will in expressing futurity on Wikipedia.) In practice the two are used interchangeably, with an occasional subtle difference in connotation, but will in that case merely implies intent (rather than expectation) not insistence. Even if that were the case, there is nothing in the German sentence that precludes it from being insistent. (Who is to say it isn't a retort?)

January 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

How to say "I will be reading more tomorrow"? I don't hear people say " I will have read more tomorrow" often in the US. Is "Ich werde morgen mehr gelesen haben" expression used often by Germans?

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmbka

Morgen werde ich mehr lesen. What is used often is something like "morgen werde ich mehr wissen", oder "morgen werde ich mehr geuebt haben". In German it is not an unusual construction.

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Do you mean "morgen werde ich mehr geglaubt haben" in your sentence above?

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmbka

Ueben = to practice

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWang2017

Do you speak Hochdeutsch or Swiss German? I can only find üben in the dictionary. No Ueben!

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmbka

Sorry, my program does not allow me to use Umlaute and the convention in this case is to add an e to the previous vowels (a, o, u).

June 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anitagomez12

No, you can't, it does not sound natural. Perhaps these links will help a bit with German word order:

http://www.duolingo.com/comment/1430570 http://german.about.com/library/weekly/aa032700a.htm

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konn0r

The fast version is incomprehensible. I'm german.

February 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmbka

The "mehr" comes out garbled.

March 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolomonPierce

True but this isn't the worst offender... There are waaaay worse ones out there :P

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AParande

Tomorrow I will read more What's wrong with this?

February 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

Yours is a non-fulfilled future.

March 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antepoljar

Tomorow my reading will be done. Anything is beter than the original.

April 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roundy_Dodo

Why is 'I will have read more tomorrow' correct and 'I will have read tomorrow more' wrong?!?!?!?!

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolomonPierce

Incorrect word order. You could say "Tomorrow (or "by tomorrow"), I will have read more", but you can't move the adverb away from the verb in this case.

April 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrey420

I have the same problem. Not sure, that the word order in english is so important

April 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vemmv

When can "I will have read more tomorrow" be used on its own instead of "I will read more tomorrow" or "I would have read more tomorrow"?

November 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelaSharot

'I will read more tomorrow' (merely implies action to be done). 'I will have read more tomorrow' (implies action already done tomorrow. (For example:' I have done a little today; but I will have done it all tomorrow.' Or, 'by tomorrow night I shall have read more than today').

'I would have read more tomorrow' implies intention thwarted. For example: 'I would have read more tomorrow - if you had let me!' Action is what you were intending to do but not cannot. For example: 'I would have read more tomorrow if you had not taken away my books!'; 'Teacher, why are you giving me a black mark for not finishing it today - when I would have read more tomorrow!'

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brandonrte

"I'm going to have read more tomorrow" is essentially the same, right? I reported it since I don't see a significant difference in meaning, but I wanted to make sure.

April 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrismoorew

In all the 'ich' examples in this unit, as for the future tense, 'I shall', which is grammatically correct, is being rejected in favour of 'I will'. 'I will' is of course colloquially correct, but surely both should be accepted. Same goes for 'we shall'. Sometimes 'I shall' and 'we shall' are marked correct, but not most of the time. Reported, again.

July 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1091

Added. But this has to be done individually for every single sentence. So please continue reporting.

July 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrismoorew

O.K. I'll do that. Thanks for the explanation.

July 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

'I will tomorrow more read have' ??

November 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1091

Is this meant as a joke? That's not English at all, but plainly mimicking the structure of the German sentence, which doesn't work.

November 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithinJP

In English, that sentence is a cluster...

April 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nrpetkovic

I am a native english speaker, and no one says this. This type of construction is just odd. Would you actually say such a thing in german?

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

It is called Futur 2. It is used in German as well as in English speaking countries. Yes, not all the people on the world use it. In Germany it is elementary school stuff - as far as I know. You will hear it more often by academics and their families than by simple workers.

July 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrismoorew

Of course we do. Rarely, but we do. Have you finished your homework? No but I shall have finished it before long. Have you cleaned your room? No but I'll have done it before you come home.

July 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fran2233

what kinda sentence is this.....-used never ,,buthurtt :xddd

June 27, 2015
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