"Дверь открыта."

Translation:The door is open.

March 19, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillEverett

I note that "дверь открыта" can have two meanings. The common meaning corresponds to the usual English "the door is open." The other meaning, less frequent, but nevertheless not rare, corresponds to the English meaning "the door is not locked." Sometimes, "open" is used in that same way in English. You knock on my closed office door, and I say, "The door is open." By this I mean that the door is not locked, and you may open it and enter.

March 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peachtree2

This is the usual way to say "unlocked" in Russian?

May 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Smike77

Yes it is.

May 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malchikrene

Is an open door correct?

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

"An open door" = открытая дверь.

January 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alkajugl

I said "A door is open" but it was marked wrong. What is there in this sentence that makes the indefinite article wrong - especially since there is no context?

March 19, 2017

[deactivated user]

    Couldn't this be in the passive voice "The door was opened"?

    September 4, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillEverett

    I think открыт, -а, -о, -ы is a short-form adjective. In the past tense, we could say "The door was open" (Дверь была открыта). I don't know about any passive voice for Russian verbs. Sometimes the reflexive form of the verb (with the -ся, -сь ending) is used similarly to the English passive form.

    September 5, 2016

    [deactivated user]

      Oh yes I forgot it needed была. Thanks. I think short form participles can be used to make the passive voice.

      September 5, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillEverett

      I view "Дверь была открыта" as similar to "Дверь была хороша."

      Searching with Google, I found four occurrences of the immediate combination of "была" and the short-form participle from открыть. (1) Понятно что на джет багги никто ничего не срезал а просто она была откроена с учётом всего этого. (2) ...думаю,єсли ты нěт по поводу тоже чех как я думал почему была откроена ета тема,почему возпоминать на вещи из прошлого времени,думаю,что надо ... (3) История бренда начала в 1919 году, когда была откроена маленькая мастерская, которая производила кустарные деревянные стулья. (4) ... пулеметов Максима и двигателей внутреннего сгорания, со складов Базы, была откроена Речная флотилия в составе двух мониторов и пяти катеров.

      I also found one occurrence of "была широко откроена": ... была широко откроена дверь в Европу и тогда начала работать и первая типография.

      September 5, 2016

      [deactivated user]

        I was under the impression that открыта was a short form adjective and participle as in "Дверь была открыта мной," (the door was opened by me).

        September 6, 2016

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillEverett

        Beware of confusing the grammar of an English translation with the grammar of the Russian original. It is a short-form adjective. Consider examples of the long-form adjective:

        Первая открытая мной дверь вела в спальню ... (http://loveread.ec/read_book.php?id=42632&p=24)

        Очередная открытая мной дверь. Решение, принятое после мучительных сомнений, вопреки логике и обстоятельствам! (http://www.psyshans.ru/blog/index.php?page=post&blog=psy-verges&post_id=47)

        С таким трудом открытая мной дверь, Была открыта, кажется, напрасно. (https://www.stihi.ru/2006/03/03-711)

        By the way, the sense of the root кры is a cover or covering: крыша - roof, крышка - lid, открыть/открывать - to uncover, discover, or open, открыватель - discoverer.

        The English verb "open" and the Russian verb "открыть" have an important difference. The English verb can be transitive (requiring an object) or intransitive: "I open the door" or "The door opens." The Russian verb is only transitive (if the object is not explicitly stated, then it is clear from the context): "Я открываю дверь." The reflexive form is similar to the English intransitive verb: "Дверь открывается."

        September 6, 2016

        [deactivated user]

          I thought the adjective for open "открытый" could be used in short form as a participle, but I guess not. Откроен must be the particple. Thanks.

          September 6, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

          There apparently aren't any participles in Russian - what look like participles are actually predicate adjectives.

          The problem is that, in English, when we use the auxiliary "to be", we often use verb forms that we call "past participles" - but they function much more like predicate adjectives, by modifying or describing the subject of the sentence. They don't really participate in forming a compound verb, as do verbs that use "to have" as the auxiliary.

          Example:
          He has gone = he left, he went away
          He is gone = he isn't here any more because he left.

          He has tired
          He is tired

          When you see a short-form adjective, it's a good rule-of-thumb to think in terms of predicate adjectives, which require that the subject be separated from the adjective by a verb: The door is open.

          (And of course, in Russian, there is no stated present tense of "to be", but you have to add it when translating to English.)

          An when you see a long-form adjective (usually with a two-letter ending like -ый, ая, ое, ий then it's more likely to be an attributive adjective which attaches directly to a noun/pronoun without an intervening verb: the open door.

          Because short-form adjectives only ever act as predicates describing the subject of the sentence, they only appear in nominative case. Long-form adjectives are fully declinable in all cases.

          April 19, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

          There are definitely participles in Russian - http://russian.cornell.edu/grammar/html/le103_110_b.htm

          April 19, 2019

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex_2607

          Is "The door is opened" correct?

          November 8, 2016

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

          Depends on what you're trying to say. The door is opened (every day in the morning) - better to say дверь открывается The door is open (it was closed but now it is open) - дверь открыта.

          January 16, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caversham

          политика открытых дверей. Would that be correct for open-door policy?

          January 16, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

          Yes

          January 16, 2017

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Likarrro

          Уходи дверь закрой у меня теперь другой

          February 23, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fnamlnam

          An open door. Correct?

          August 2, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keinemeinung

          Short forms of adjective like Открыт often play the role of a predicate (verb phrase). "An open door" would be "открытая дверь"

          August 2, 2018

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yasmine_y

          «Дверь открыта, Сора.»

          November 15, 2018
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