"She intends to listen to the woman."

Translation:Tá fúithi éisteacht leis an mbean.

March 19, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ahmadMassalha

why is it "an mbean" & not "an bhean" ?

April 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaMohun

I am a beginner and don't have much business answering, but I will try since there are crickets here in Irish Discussion Land. Look again at the rules for eclipsis. One of the rules is that if there is a preposition followed by the singular definite article, there needs to be eclipsis, which for words beginning with b becomes "mb". So if you just have "an" before bean, you have lenition: "bhean", but since you have "leis" + "an" + bean, there is eclipsis and bean becomes "mbean". The eclipsis and lenition rules are hard for me to absorb and I keep having to go back and look at that.

October 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/GavinPross

Eclipsis isn't the simple rule after prepositions + an. It varies with preposition and dialect. There is a handy table listing the variants under the section 'articles with prepositions' here: http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/artikel.htm

July 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
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The Tips & Notes for the Eclipsis skill gives a slightly more understandable table for learners.

July 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/GavinPross

With the caveat that learners should be aware that the Ulster dialect is different. The Collins Easy Learning Irish Grammar suggests that 'It is useful to learn both' (p.180)

July 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1050

Like English speakers learning that "color" and "colour" are both correct spellings, but in different dialects, learners should, at some point in their journey, learn to recognize that some of the "mistakes" that they encounter aren't mistakes in other dialects of Irish. "Learn both" is a bit excessive.

July 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EileanoirCM

This may be a stupid question, but doesn't the gender of the noun effect the prepositional pronoun? It's definitely "leis" as opposed to "léi"?

March 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling

This exercise’s leis is not a prepositional pronoun; it’s the preposition le, which becomes leis before either an or na.

March 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Yes, it's leis. Gender only inflects the prepositions when a pronoun is the object of it (so 'to her' would be léithe). Otherwise, when it comes before an or na it becomes leis, regardless of the gender of the following noun.

March 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/gerard.nellis

Also stumped why this is "mbean" and not "bhean"

May 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/stmonkeydoom

Shouldn't it be ag éistacht? What am I missing?

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
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Why would it be ag éisteacht? ag éisteacht doesn't mean "to listen".

February 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/stmonkeydoom

Well, I spelled éistacht wrong, but other than that. Éistacht is the verbal noun form of éist. When using verbal nouns in Irish, you usually use the particle ag before it. So Iḿ wondering why that isn't being used here.

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
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No, you don't "usually" use the particle ag before a verbal noun. There are lots of ways to use the verbal noun that don't involve ag:
Táim i mo chodladh
Tá an raidió le cloisteáil
Ba cheart dúinn é a dhéanamh
An bhfuil siad á léamh?

ag+VN is one of the first uses that beginners encounter in a consistent way, because English and Irish both use the present progressive a lot, but the verbal noun is not restricted to that usage.

February 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/stmonkeydoom

So, if ag is used for present possessive, shouldn't the first phrase be Táim í mó ag chodladh since you're possessing the sleep?

February 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1050

"present possessive"???? What's that when it's at home?

The "present progressive" is also called the "Present continuous"

You might be mixing up the Irish equivalent for the English verb "have" - tá X ag Y, which combines the verb with the preposition ag, but a possessive adjective like mo isn't a verb, so it doesn't need ag, any more than "my" requires "have" in English.

February 18, 2019
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